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Memorial unveiled to heroes of Atlantic

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His Royal Highness Prince Michael of Kent who led the Battle of the Atlantic Commemoration in Londonderry at the weekend. The Prince unveiled a statue of a sailor at Ebrington Square, which is aligned with the same statue in Downtown, Halifax, Nova Scotia. The statue project to erect the statue was undertaken by the Atlantic Chief and Petty Officers’ Association of Canada and the Londonderry Branch of The Royal Naval Association. The Prince also laid a wreath at the cenotaph in the city on sunday. The series of events marked the 70th Anniversary of what was to be the longest battle of the second world war protecting vital convoys. Picture Martin McKeown. Inpresspics.com. 12.5.13

His Royal Highness Prince Michael of Kent who led the Battle of the Atlantic Commemoration in Londonderry at the weekend. The Prince unveiled a statue of a sailor at Ebrington Square, which is aligned with the same statue in Downtown, Halifax, Nova Scotia. The statue project to erect the statue was undertaken by the Atlantic Chief and Petty Officers’ Association of Canada and the Londonderry Branch of The Royal Naval Association. The Prince also laid a wreath at the cenotaph in the city on sunday. The series of events marked the 70th Anniversary of what was to be the longest battle of the second world war protecting vital convoys. Picture Martin McKeown. Inpresspics.com. 12.5.13

His Royal Highness Prince Michael of Kent who led the Battle of the Atlantic Commemoration in Londonderry at the weekend. The Prince unveiled a statue of a sailor at Ebrington Square, which is aligned with the same statue in Downtown, Halifax, Nova Scotia. The statue project to erect the statue was undertaken by the Atlantic Chief and Petty Officers’ Association of Canada and the Londonderry Branch of The Royal Naval Association. The Prince also laid a wreath at the cenotaph in the city on sunday. The series of events marked the 70th Anniversary of what was to be the longest battle of the second world war protecting vital convoys. Picture Martin McKeown. Inpresspics.com. 12.5.13

A new generation of sea cadets has joined naval veterans who fought in World War Two to unveil a new statue to mark the 70th anniversary of the historic Battle of the Atlantic.

Prince Michael of Kent saluted the wartime heroes in Londonderry yesterday as he unveiled the memorial, called the International Sailor.

The statue at Ebrington Square of a young, uniformed sailor carrying his kit bag is a replica of another in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

At yesterday's Royal Naval Association event, a handful of the remaining Canadian veterans proudly pinned their medals on and laid wreaths on the Foyle to remember fallen comrades.

Other guests from the US, Australia, Italy and Norway were also present for the ceremony.

Tribute was also paid to the people of Derry, a city which played a key role in the maritime victory.

Derry was home to many of the destroyers and frigates involved in the bloody Atlantic battle. Its westerly position meant that it was the most strategic and important of four UK ports for the Allied forces battling the U-boat threat to the Atlantic convoy lifeline.

Britain depended on the sea lanes, and Ulster's strategic position put it in the frontline of keeping the supply lines open.

Foyle MLA William Hay said: "On this historic day for the City of Londonderry we remember the distinguished role of the Royal Navy and all international seamen who served with courage and distinction in the Battle of the Atlantic."

Belfast Telegraph


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