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Michelle O’Neill accuses unionist parties of denying abortion services to women

A DUP MLA said that the current abortion laws send out the message that people with disabilities are less worthy of protection.

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Pro choice and anti abortion campaigners at Stormont in 2019 (Niall Carson/PA)

Pro choice and anti abortion campaigners at Stormont in 2019 (Niall Carson/PA)

Pro choice and anti abortion campaigners at Stormont in 2019 (Niall Carson/PA)

The DUP and Ulster Unionists have been accused of denying abortion services to women in Northern Ireland by deputy First Minister Michelle O’Neill.

Ms O’Neill made her comments at Stormont during the consideration stage of a DUP Private Member’s Bill aimed at outlawing late term abortions being carried out in cases of serious non-fatal disabilities.

The Bill was introduced after Westminster passed legislation liberalising the region’s abortion laws while the Stormont Assembly was collapsed in 2019.

Backing the Private Members Bill, DUP MLA Deborah Erskine told MLAs that the current law sends the message that people with disabilities are less worthy of protection than those without disabilities.

But Ms O’Neill said the Bill was part of a “shameful” strategy to block abortion services.

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Deputy First Minister Michelle O’Neill said women had waited long enough to access abortion services (Liam McBurney/PA)

Deputy First Minister Michelle O’Neill said women had waited long enough to access abortion services (Liam McBurney/PA)

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Deputy First Minister Michelle O’Neill said women had waited long enough to access abortion services (Liam McBurney/PA)

She said: “The women of this island have waited long enough for access to modern and compassionate abortion health services. That is an undeniable appalling fact.

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“Yet here we are today where, instead of supporting the provision of modern, compassionate abortion services for women, the DUP and UUP continues to hold up and deny this essential health care service to women and girls who need it.”

She continued: “A new generation of women will not abide a repeat of the failures of the past particularly when it comes to their health care.

“It is now more than a year since the law was changed, and the Health Minister (Robin Swann) has still not moved to implement these services. He must answer why this is the case.

“And meanwhile, women wait for access to care that they so badly need, sometimes in the most traumatic of circumstances the DUP continue with a strategy designed to block abortion services.

“This is shameful.

“As political leaders, and as parties in a power-sharing executive, we have a responsibility to deliver public services for everyone.

“The women of the north see you and the women in your communities see you.”

We have had enough of women being exiled abroad or taking abortion pills, often alone and afraid, without medical supervisionMichelle O'Neill

The Sinn Fein deputy First Minister said her party has submitted a Private Members Motion on the commissioning of services and is seeking cross-party support for it.

She added: “We have had enough of women being exiled abroad or taking abortion pills, often alone and afraid, without medical supervision.

“This is the moment to draw the line.”

Ms Erskine spoke to MLAs in support of the Private Member’s Bill.

“This Bill is a targeted piece of draft legislation which focuses on stereotypes against disabilities.”

She said the legislation passed in Westminster “added to the stigma” faced by disabled people in society.

The current law sends the message that people with disabilities are less worthy of protection than those without disabilitiesDeborah Erskine

She said: “The current law sends the message that people with disabilities are less worthy of protection than those without disabilities.

“What a disappointing message to send out from this Assembly and a troubling legacy to leave.

“Consider the impact of this law.

“Disability is not a disease.

“It is our job to ensure that those faced with these challenges have every opportunity to overcome these.

“It would be totally condemned if a country’s abortion laws singled out babies on the grounds of gender or skin colour, but because it is a disability this is somehow viewed as acceptable.

“It isn’t.”

Northern Ireland’s previously restrictive laws were changed by MPs at Westminster in 2019 at a time when the Stormont administration was collapsed.

The laws allow abortion in all circumstances up to 12 weeks.

Terminations are permitted up to 24 weeks when there is a risk to the woman’s physical or mental health.

There is no time limit in cases of fatal foetal abnormality or when there has been a diagnosis of a serious physical or mental impairment that would cause a serious disability.

Abortions after 24 weeks in those circumstances are rare.


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