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Nowhere in Northern Ireland makes UK list of top 50 places to live

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Halifax published a UK top 50 - but not a single part of Northern Ireland or Wales made it in (stock picture)

Halifax published a UK top 50 - but not a single part of Northern Ireland or Wales made it in (stock picture)

Halifax published a UK top 50 - but not a single part of Northern Ireland or Wales made it in (stock picture)

Not a single area of Northern Ireland has made it into the top 50 of an annual UK quality of life survey.

East Hertfordshire has been crowned the UK's best place to live. Northern Ireland's top performer was Lisburn & Castlereagh at 131st.

Containing popular market towns such as Bishop's Stortford and Hertford, East Hertfordshire made it to the top due to strong exam results, high life expectancy, excellent health and happiness scores, and high average earnings.

The Halifax Quality of Life survey looks at how local authority areas compare, and takes into consideration 26 different factors that home buyers may consider when choosing a place to live.

These factors include employment, earnings, housing affordability, health and wellbeing, education, traffic and crime rates.

Halifax said the latest Office for National Statistics (ONS) figures indicate adults living in East Hertfordshire are among the most happy and content in the UK, with high average life expectancies.

Halifax published a UK top 50 - but not a single part of Northern Ireland or Wales made it in.

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The South East of England claims 18 spots in the top 50 best places to live.

Wales' highest placing was the Vale of Glamorgan at 126.

The Scottish Orkney Islands (18th) were the only locality north of the English border to feature, and no London local authorities appear in the top 50.

Despite Northern Ireland's abysmal showing, some council areas performed well in certain categories.

The UK's biggest houses are in Fermanagh & Omagh, at 159 square metres, compared to a UK average of 113.

The lowest average price of a house per metre square was Mid Ulster, at £978 - much less than half the UK average of £2,488.

Fermanagh & Omagh also had the highest spend per pupil in Northern Ireland at £3,304 - although this was less than half of the amount spent on pupils in Tower Hamlets, London.

Russell Galley, managing director, Halifax said: "Everyone has different priorities when it comes to choosing a place to live, depending on time of life, and personal circumstances. Affordability will always be one of the most important factors, with getting a foot on the property ladder still difficult for some people."


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