Belfast Telegraph

Over a third of Northern Ireland's young adults still living at home

More young people are still living with their parents in Northern Ireland than any other part of the UK.
More young people are still living with their parents in Northern Ireland than any other part of the UK.

Over a third of Northern Ireland's young adults are still living at home with their parents.

The latest government research shows that 34% of 20-34 year olds have not permanently moved out of their parents home.

Northern Ireland has more young people still living at home than any other part of the of the UK, leading the rest by some distance.

In 2017 England had 26% of young adults still living at home with Scotland next up on 25%, while Wales was the lowest with 23%.

With many young people returning to live with their parents after leaving home for the first time, it has led to the current generation of young people being dubbed the 'Boomerang Generation'.

Interim director of the Chartered Institute of Housing Professor Paddy Gray said that the need for large deposits to buy a house were leading to young people staying with their parents for longer.

"Ten, 20 years ago the lending criteria would not have been as strict and you would have had 5% deposits and in some cases 100% loans," he told the BBC.

"Money was easier to get access too and people did have long-term jobs.

"We have a gig economy now, particularly for young people who are working different part time jobs.

"They don't have the security of jobs for life. Lenders will look at that as well."

Professor Gray said that the number of people commuting to work also suited those living at home.

"In other major cities in England in particular like London, Birmingham, Manchester, students would come in to the area and then stay there after because they're living there," he said.

"Whereas our students maybe only come down two nights a week and then go back home to living with their parents again.

He said that the legacy of the Troubles also played a factor.

"Particularly in areas where there are interfaces, people don't want to move because they want to stay in the safety of their communities," Professor Gray said.

"Also there isn't the housing available because on one side of the wall there could be high waiting lists where people can't get access to other housing."

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