Belfast Telegraph

Parents' anger as children find pills discarded at Bangor bonfire site

Residents in Bangor were outraged after primary school children found bottles of tablets dumped on the site of a bonfire. (stock picture)
Residents in Bangor were outraged after primary school children found bottles of tablets dumped on the site of a bonfire. (stock picture)

By Mark McConville

Residents in Bangor were outraged after primary school children found bottles of tablets dumped on the site of a bonfire.

The pills were discovered in black bags that had been dumped at the Bloomfield estate bonfire at around teatime on Saturday.

The discovery was labelled an "absolutely disgusting thing for the children in our community to find" on a Facebook page that posts updates about the Bloomfield bonfire.

The post added: "This is a massive reminder that our bonfire fields are NOT a dumping ground for household waste.

"The outcome of this could have been a very different story! These drugs will now be disposed of appropriately in a drug bin."

The careless nature of the tablet disposal was condemned by DUP councillor Wesley Irvine.

He said: "It was reckless to leave tablets in an area with a playground close by and a bonfire site where many children would help out.

"There could have been serious consequences if they had fallen into the wrong hands."

Residents also took to social media to share their anger.

One expressed concern that "any child could have got a hold of them". Another said: "Totally disgusted to see this. My kids like to think they are 'helping' at the bonfire and to come across this could have been a very different story."

The children who found the tablets were praised for their common sense in handing them in, while another resident hit out at the person who dumped the pills. He said: "More than likely dumped by a parent with no regard for other people's safety.

"What hope do our children have if we ourselves are still dragging our knuckles like Neanderthals?"

The bonfire in Bloomfield was replaced in 2018 by a beacon and family fun day in an effort to promote a "cleaner, safer environment for all the community".

But the traditional bonfire was brought back this year following "uproar" from local people, according to one concerned resident. They claimed the bonfire had become a "dumping ground for household waste including soiled nappies".

The PSNI said no report of the tablets had been made to police.

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