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PSNI remove Derry posters claiming to reveal Soldier F identity

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A sign supporting Soldier F. Pic: Peter Morrison

A sign supporting Soldier F. Pic: Peter Morrison

A sign supporting Soldier F. Pic: Peter Morrison

The PSNI has removed posters in Londonderry allegedly revealing the identity of Bloody Sunday paratrooper Soldier F.

Despite a court order banning the naming of the former soldier, posters were placed around the city, including Guildhall Square, while they were also shared online.

It comes after the PPS decision not to prosecute the former soldier in connection with killings during Bloody Sunday in 1972. It also dropped the case against another soldier accused of the murder of a school boy in July that year.

The families of those killed expressed their disappointment at the collapse of the trial of Soldier F, saying they will challenge the decision in the High Court.

Soldier F was accused of murdering James Wray and William McKinney on January 30 1972, when soldiers opened fire on civil rights demonstrators in the Bogside area of Londonderry, killing 13 people.

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James Wray (left) and William McKinney who died on Bloody Sunday. Photo: Bloody Sunday Trust/PA Wire.

James Wray (left) and William McKinney who died on Bloody Sunday. Photo: Bloody Sunday Trust/PA Wire.

PA

James Wray (left) and William McKinney who died on Bloody Sunday. Photo: Bloody Sunday Trust/PA Wire.

The ex-paratrooper was also accused of the attempted murders of Patrick O'Donnell, Joseph Friel, Joe Mahon and Michael Quinn.

Proceedings against Soldier B who was to be prosecuted with the murder of 15-year-old Daniel Hegarty in July 1972, and of wounding with intent of his cousin Christopher Hegarty, were also withdrawn.

Soldier F was granted anonymity during the 1972 Widgery Inquiry into Bloody Sunday and last month, a court ruled that he should be allowed to retain anonymity.

A spokesperson for the PSNI said it became aware of two posters that had been erected in Guildhall Square in the city on Saturday. “Officers attended and removed the material,” said the PSNI. “Enquiries into this incident are ongoing.”


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