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PSNI work 'hit by security threat'

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Chief inspector Michael Maguire commended the commitment shown to improving how the police engage with Northern Ireland's communities

Chief inspector Michael Maguire commended the commitment shown to improving how the police engage with Northern Ireland's communities

Chief inspector Michael Maguire commended the commitment shown to improving how the police engage with Northern Ireland's communities

The increasing security threat in Northern Ireland is seen by police as a major barrier to delivering good service to communities, a report has said.

The threat affected the ability to patrol or attend requests for assistance and created a continuing need to use officers for public order duties, Criminal Justice Inspection Northern Ireland said. The report also found that overall customer service was taken seriously by senior management with the PSNI.

Northern Ireland is facing the most severe threat for some time from dissident republicans who blew up Constable Ronan Kerr, 25, in an under-car bomb on April 2. A building society was also bombed in Londonderry on Saturday.

The 42-page report, PSNI Customer Service, said: "The increasing security threat was a constant background to the work of PSNI officers and was seen as a major barrier to delivering a good customer service to communities.

"The impact of this was widespread, for example in relation to officers' priorities, the ability to patrol or attend requests for assistance, the continuing need to use officers for public order policing and the level of resources required to address the dissident threat."

Police told inspectors they were unable to deliver good customer service because of the perceived pressures of work and bureaucracy.

"It was clear from interviews with a wide range of officers at the point of service delivery that they felt constrained by a variety of issues including perceived pressure of work, the security threat and unnecessary bureaucracy," the report said.

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It added: "Supervisors and other leaders spoken to concurred with these observations and indicated that their focus was on what the police could do with resources available to them rather than what could be achieved to meet customer needs."

Assistant Chief Constable Will Kerr said in the time which has elapsed between this inspection report being carried out and published, the PSNI has made significant progress on the majority of recommendations.

Chief inspector Michael Maguire said: "We commend the commitment shown to improving how the police engage with the communities by the chief constable and welcome the work which is ongoing to translate this vision of personal, professional and protective policing into day-to-day service delivery."


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