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Quinns 'are being made scapegoats'

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Peter Quinn says his family were made scapegoats of the crisis surrounding Anglo Irish Bank

Peter Quinn says his family were made scapegoats of the crisis surrounding Anglo Irish Bank

Peter Quinn says his family were made scapegoats of the crisis surrounding Anglo Irish Bank

The Quinn family has been made scapegoats of the financial crisis surrounding the former Anglo Irish bank, Peter Quinn has claimed.

The brother of former billionaire Sean Quinn, and a prominent figure in his own right who was once president of the GAA, said his family remained united in the face of major criticism and damning court findings.

He said there was no split over the decision of Sean Quinn Jr to go to jail for contempt of court, while his son Peter Darragh avoided prison by remaining in Northern Ireland. Mr Quinn claimed his son believed he had tried to purge his contempt and saw no reason why he should go to prison.

"There's one thing about the Quinns - we have never split on any issue and we won't split on this issue," he told BBC Radio Ulster's Sunday Sequence.

"There has never been a family dispute in our generation of any significance and there won't be. Sure, Peter's north of the border, Sean's in jail - they both made the decision.

"Sean was asked by his father if he was going to go to jail, he said he would go to jail if that's what was in the best interests of the group. Peter was asked if he would go to jail, he said he didn't see any reason why he should go to jail."

Last month a court ruled that Peter Darragh Quinn, Sean Quinn Sr and Sean Quinn Jr, were in contempt after assets worth millions were put out of reach of the bank. The renamed Irish Banking Resolution Corporation (IBRC) claims the Quinns owe it about £2 billion (2.5 billion euro).

Mr Quinn predicted the younger generation of his family would be back in business, but said they had been scape-goated. He attacked politicians and the media and said they should be dropped "into the middle of the Atlantic".

The family's business dealings have come in for major criticism, but Mr Quinn denied they were to blame for the bank's collapse.

"That's not our fault that it went wrong. It went wrong to a royal degree because the bank was undertaking activities which it shouldn't have been undertaking. It was not being honest with its shareholders, it was not being honest with the investment community and indeed it was not being honest with its borrowers."

PA


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