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Record temperature in NI for second time in five days

People have been urged to reduce their water usage amid the July heatwave.

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A dry creek the feeds into Spelga Reservoir in the Mourne Mountains of County Down (Liam McBurney/PA)

A dry creek the feeds into Spelga Reservoir in the Mourne Mountains of County Down (Liam McBurney/PA)

A dry creek the feeds into Spelga Reservoir in the Mourne Mountains of County Down (Liam McBurney/PA)

Northern Ireland has recorded its highest ever temperature for the second time in five days.

The Met Office said the new provisional record temperature was recorded on Wednesday in Castlederg, Co Tyrone.

It comes as the region continues to bask in a July heatwave, leading to urgent warnings that people must reduce their water usage to avoid failures in the network.

The Met Office has issued an amber warning over extreme heat, which lasts from Wednesday until Friday.

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People queue for ice creams at Helen’s Bay beach in County Down (Liam McBurney/PA)

People queue for ice creams at Helen’s Bay beach in County Down (Liam McBurney/PA)

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People queue for ice creams at Helen’s Bay beach in County Down (Liam McBurney/PA)

A tweet from the Met Office said: “Northern Ireland has for the second time in 5 days provisionally broken it’s all-time temperature record.

“Castlederg in County Tyrone recorded a temperature of 31.3 °C at 1437 this afternoon.

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“This exceeds the 31.2 °C that Ballywatticock recorded last Saturday.”

Before Saturday, the previous highest Northern Ireland temperature of 30.8C was recorded on July 12 1983 and June 30 1976.

NI Water said that because of the hot weather, demand for water is currently outstripping supply.

Des Nevin, director of customer operations, said: “If demand continues at this level it will lead to failures in our network and some customers will lose supply or suffer low pressure.

“A number of customers over the past few days are already experiencing this, especially those on high ground.

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Neil Russell, and his wife, Liz, from Dunmurry walk their dog Teddy along a pathway exposed by the falling water level at Spelga Reservoir (Liam McBurney/PA)

Neil Russell, and his wife, Liz, from Dunmurry walk their dog Teddy along a pathway exposed by the falling water level at Spelga Reservoir (Liam McBurney/PA)

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Neil Russell, and his wife, Liz, from Dunmurry walk their dog Teddy along a pathway exposed by the falling water level at Spelga Reservoir (Liam McBurney/PA)

“On Monday, we put 723 million litres of water into our distribution system, this is over 145 million litres more than normal, equivalent to 1.8million baths.

“We are asking our customers to help us, especially over the next few days when temperatures continue to be high.

“We know from the increase in our night usage some customers are leaving sprinklers and hoses on overnight.”

Mr Nevin added: “A hose uses more water in one hour than the average family uses in a whole day. A pressure washer can also be a massive drain, so please think about whether the task is really essential at the moment.”

“While it is tempting, please avoid using swimming or paddling pools. Filling a 12ft swimming pool uses the same amount of water 500 people use for daily handwashing.

“We want everyone to enjoy their home and garden, we just need people to think about how they use their water and if what they are doing is essential.”


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