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Renal cancer more often found in men than women

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Kidney cancer usually affects adults in their 60s and 70s - it is rare in people under 50

Kidney cancer usually affects adults in their 60s and 70s - it is rare in people under 50

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Kidney cancer usually affects adults in their 60s and 70s - it is rare in people under 50

Kidney cancer, also called renal cancer, tends to affect more men than women in Northern Ireland.

According to the most recent figures from the Northern Ireland Cancer Registry (NICR), 177 males were diagnosed with kidney cancer here in 2018.

Fewer women were diagnosed with kidney cancer in 2018 - standing at 107, according to the figures.

Overall, kidney cancer diagnoses in Northern Ireland made up 2% of all new cancer cases in 2018.

Incidences of kidney cancer in Northern Ireland are higher in men than women, according to the NICR statistics.

The number of men diagnosed with kidney cancer between 2014 and 2018 was almost double the number of women in Northern Ireland who were told they had the disease - 1,032 cases compared to 571.

Kidney cancer usually affects adults in their 60s and 70s - it is rare in people under 50.

Early kidney cancers usually do not cause any signs or symptoms, but larger ones may.

Some possible signs and symptoms of kidney cancer include blood in the urine, low back pain on one side, fatigue and weight loss not caused by dieting.

The Northern Ireland Direct website states that the outlook for kidney cancer largely depends on how big the tumour is and how far it has spread by the time it is diagnosed.

If the cancer is still small and hasn't spread beyond the kidney, surgery can often cure it. Some small, slow growing cancers may not need treatment at first.

A cure is not usually possible if the cancer has spread, although treatment can sometimes help keep it under control. Some people become ill quickly, but others may live for several years and feel well despite their cancer.

In Northern Ireland, overall, more than seven in every 10 people live at least a year after diagnosis and more than five in 10 people live at least 10 years.

Factors that can increase the chances of someone getting kidney cancer generally include obesity, high blood pressure and a family history of the disease.

Belfast Telegraph


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