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Storm Barra NI: Warnings of fallen trees and branches as weather calms

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Storm Barra smashed through Ballywalter’s harbour wall on Tuesday, creating a vast crater on the access road and trapping a fisherman’s car on the pier. (Photo by Graham Baalham-Curry for Belfast Telegraph)

Storm Barra smashed through Ballywalter’s harbour wall on Tuesday, creating a vast crater on the access road and trapping a fisherman’s car on the pier. (Photo by Graham Baalham-Curry for Belfast Telegraph)

Storm Barra smashed through the wall at Ballywalter harbour yesterday

Storm Barra smashed through the wall at Ballywalter harbour yesterday

Portavogie promenade is covered in debris after the storm

Portavogie promenade is covered in debris after the storm

Construction work resumes on the play park in Donaghadee after it was submerged by water yesterday

Construction work resumes on the play park in Donaghadee after it was submerged by water yesterday

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Storm Barra smashed through Ballywalter’s harbour wall on Tuesday, creating a vast crater on the access road and trapping a fisherman’s car on the pier. (Photo by Graham Baalham-Curry for Belfast Telegraph)

A clean-up operation is under way after Storm Barra passed through Northern Ireland.

Wet weather and gusts of up to 50mph in parts of the region have continued to cause difficulties as the Met Office warned of the risk of some falling trees and branches on Wednesday.

A yellow weather warning was in place for much of Tuesday as a result of Storm Barra, which brought strong winds, caused home owners to lose power to their properties and caused damage to several areas.

It was overall a drier and brighter day on Wednesday, with showers becoming less widespread as the day went on, despite inclement weather remaining over Fermanagh, parts of Tyrone and other areas.

The highest temperatures reached 7C with a significant chill factor due to the wind, especially along the north coast.

Around 500 customers are without power on Wednesday according to Northern Ireland Electricity after significant electricity outages during the worst of the storm. Faults are due to "severe weather conditions causing damage to the network”, they said.

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The storm caused significant damage to Northern Ireland’s coastal areas, including a wall at Ballywalter Harbour, where a crater was created on an access road that trapped a fisherman’s car.

A concrete slab was forced from its fixing at Donaghadee harbour and blown several metres away before landing on the pier.

Meanwhile, Belfast Continental Christmas Market reopened after it was shut on Tuesday due to the bad weather conditions.

The Stormont Christmas tree had been damaged in the storm and was shredded to the dismay of many on social media.

The National Trust estate Mount Stewart also reopened but a spokesperson said following the storm "some areas will be closed whilst the ranger and garden teams clear the damage". A trail in the park will run again from Thursday.

In Belfast, both Victoria Park and the Marsh-wiggle Way pathway in Orangefield Park have now reopened, while in Fermanagh, the Stragowna Road in Enniskillen has reopened at Derrylin and Kinawley after fallen trees in the area were cleared.

Northern Ireland saw some of the strongest recorded gusts in the UK on Tuesday, with 76mph at Orlock, Co Down and wind speeds of 71mph at Magilligan, County Londonderry.

For the weekend, bright spells and scattered showers are expected on Friday before a more persistent, heavier band of rain coming along on Saturday. Sunday is predicted to be cloudy with occasional rain.

Storm Barra is the second named storm of the season and arrives just ten days after Storm Arwen late in November, which caused three fatalities in the UK.

Meanwhile, thousands of homes remain without power in the Republic of Ireland due to strong winds and heavy rain.

The Department of Education there recommended for schools to remain closed as orange weather warnings for some counties came to an end on Wednesday morning and afternoon.

Around 26,000 properties in Donegal, Cork, Wexford and Kerry were issued with a boil water notice as a result of the storm.


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