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Temperatures stay high, but thunderstorm warnings issued for Northern Ireland

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Warm weather continues across Northern Ireland. People on the beach at Helen’s Bay, Co. Down. Picture by Jonathan Porter/PressEye

Warm weather continues across Northern Ireland. People on the beach at Helen’s Bay, Co. Down. Picture by Jonathan Porter/PressEye

Warm weather continues across Northern Ireland. People on the beach at Helen’s Bay, Co. Down. Picture by Jonathan Porter/PressEye

Warm weather continues across Northern Ireland. People on the beach at Helen’s Bay, Co. Down. Picture by Jonathan Porter/PressEye

Warm weather continues across Northern Ireland. People on the beach at Helen’s Bay, Co. Down. Picture by Jonathan Porter/PressEye

Warm weather continues across Northern Ireland. People on the beach at Helen’s Bay, Co. Down. Picture by Jonathan Porter/PressEye

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Warm weather continues across Northern Ireland. People on the beach at Helen’s Bay, Co. Down. Picture by Jonathan Porter/PressEye

While temperatures remained high here on Tuesday, many parts of Northern Ireland experienced heavy and thundery showers, with a Level 1 warning for potential localised flooding being issued.

It was also more downcast compared to Monday’s blue skies. However, many were still able to enjoy the heat, particularly in Co Down, with Helen’s Bay and Holywood Sea Park jam-packed again.

At noon, Murlough Bay had reached 26C – the hottest temperature in Northern Ireland on Tuesday – and was 10 degrees warmer than the north coast, which had rain and clouds. Downpatrick stayed at around 24C throughout the day.

It wasn’t long before rain hit the west, with thunder creeping into Derry’s wet weather in the afternoon. Belfast also had some showers later in the day, although the city centre stayed at 23C.

The NI Weather and Flood Advisory Service issued a Level 1 warning in early afternoon regarding heavy showers and thunderstorms, which moved in off the Irish sea, affecting parts of Co Down and Co Antrim.

“These may be heavy at times leading to a risk of localised flooding along with the risk of thunder and lightning,” it said.

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“Other scattered showers and thunderstorms are likely to develop across other parts of Northern Ireland, hence a warning covering all parts for this risk.

“The showers/thunderstorms are likely to be hit and miss with some places remaining dry throughout, although where they do occur you can expect heavy rainfall, along with possible lightning.”

Meanwhile, the UK marked its hottest day on record on Tuesday. The Met Office said that “for the first time ever, 40C has provisionally been exceeded”. London Heathrow reported a temperature of 40.2C at 12.50pm.

The Met Office added that the UK provisionally had its warmest night from Monday through to Tuesday morning. In Northern Ireland, Monday night was extremely humid, with some spots dipping no lower than 20C.

Environmental groups have responded to the record-breaking temperatures with warnings that the candidates for the new Tory leadership must prioritise ways to tackle the climate crisis.

Mike Childs, head of science, policy and research at Friends of the Earth, said: “As communities across the UK face unprecedented temperatures, the government’s climate strategy was yesterday found to be unlawful and inadequate in the courts.

“Candidates vying for Conservative Party leadership cannot ignore the vital importance of curbing the climate and nature crises. We need climate action that goes further, and faster, so that the next generation has a world left to inherit.”

BBC NI weatherman Barra Best has also warned of climate change issues.

He said: “The previous hottest day here before last year was in 1983. It took nearly 40 years to beat it, and now we could beat it again within 12 months. These are records we don’t necessarily want to break.”

The village of Derrylin in Co Fermanagh was confirmed as the hottest spot here on Monday. It peaked at 31.1C – only 0.2 degrees lower than the hottest-ever recorded temperature of 31.3C in Castlederg, Co Tyrone, last July.

The Met Office predicted “a much less warm night” on Tuesday with a “minimum temperature of 13C”.

Wednesday is expected to be “a mainly dry day with some sunny intervals, clouds building to bring the odd light shower with temperatures nearer normal and a maximum temperature of 19C”.


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