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Tesco reviewing Ashers 'gay cake' judgement

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While not identical to the Ashers’ gay cake controversy, this story touches on some of the same themes and dilemmas

While not identical to the Ashers’ gay cake controversy, this story touches on some of the same themes and dilemmas

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While not identical to the Ashers’ gay cake controversy, this story touches on some of the same themes and dilemmas

Tesco has said it is reviewing the judgement in the 'gay cake' case, in which Ashers bakery was found to have discriminated against a gay customer.

The supermarket giant stocks Ashers products, the most recognisable being multi-packs of sausage rolls, across its Northern Ireland stores.

The bakery was on Tuesday found to have unlawfully discriminated against a gay customer, Gareth Lee, by refusing to make a cake with a pro-gay marriage slogan.

When asked by Twitter user @belfastbarman if Tesco had any comment on the case verdict, the company replied: "We are reviewing the judgement and will discuss it with Ashers.

"Tesco has a great track record of working with local suppliers, large and small, from across Northern Ireland.

"Our focus and our commitment is to serve customers in all communities, from all backgrounds and beliefs."

A spokesman later confirmed that no Ashers products had been removed from the shelves.

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County Court Judge Isobel Brownlie delivered her judgment to a packed courtroom on Tuesday morning, following a three-day court hearing and seven weeks of deliberation.

Mr Lee, who launched legal action against the bakery with the help of the Equality Commission, was awarded £500 damages.

Judge Brownlie told the court she accepted that the defendants had "genuine and deeply held" religious views, but said the business was not above the law.

"The defendants are not a religious organisation. They are conducting a business for profit and, notwithstanding their genuine religious beliefs, there are no exceptions available under (law) which apply to this case," she said.

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