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The chance to make NI an economically successful country has been handed to us on a platter... why would majority vote for a united Ireland?

Part two of a three-part series in which our Business Editor examines the impact of the controversial trade deal

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Checks: Customs and border officials watch on as freight disembarks at Larne harbour, one of the main entry points between Northern Ireland and the rest of the United Kingdom. Credit: Charles McQuillan

Checks: Customs and border officials watch on as freight disembarks at Larne harbour, one of the main entry points between Northern Ireland and the rest of the United Kingdom. Credit: Charles McQuillan

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Esmond Birnie. Credit: Nigel McDowell/Ulster University

Esmond Birnie. Credit: Nigel McDowell/Ulster University

Andrew Webb, Chief Economist at Grant Thornton

Andrew Webb, Chief Economist at Grant Thornton

Michael and Lesley Cairnduff of Oscar Pet Foods in Co Down

Michael and Lesley Cairnduff of Oscar Pet Foods in Co Down

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Checks: Customs and border officials watch on as freight disembarks at Larne harbour, one of the main entry points between Northern Ireland and the rest of the United Kingdom. Credit: Charles McQuillan

The NI Protocol is leading to business investment in Northern Ireland of a kind unseen for decades, an economist has said.

Andrew Webb, chief economist at Grant Thornton, said the trading arrangement to keep Northern Ireland a single market for goods had provided the sort of fillip to the economy long promised from a cut in corporation tax.


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