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Theresa May sets date for MPs vote on Brexit

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Prime Minister Theresa May make a statements in the House of Commons, London, following last week's EU summit - Credit: House of Commons/PA Wire

Prime Minister Theresa May make a statements in the House of Commons, London, following last week's EU summit - Credit: House of Commons/PA Wire

PA

Prime Minister Theresa May make a statements in the House of Commons, London, following last week's EU summit - Credit: House of Commons/PA Wire

Theresa May has announced her withdrawal deal will be put to a vote in the House of Commons in the week beginning January 14.

Parliamentarians had been due to vote on the deal last week, but this was called off at the last minute after the Prime Minister admitted she did not have the support to get it through.

Following the delay, she undertook a whirlwind tour of meetings across EU capitals and at a summit in Brussels in a bid to secure legal assurances on the deal - specifically in relation to the Irish backstop.

In the Commons on Monday, Mr Corbyn accused Mrs May of cynically running down the clock on the March 29 Brexit deadline.

He said: "The Prime Minister has cynically run down the clock, trying to manoeuvre Parliament into a choice between two unacceptable outcomes - her deal or no deal.

"A responsible prime minister would for the good of this country have put the deal before the House this week, so we can move on from this Government's disastrous negotiations.

"It's clear the Prime Minister has failed to renegotiate her deal, failed to get any meaningful reassurances - there is no excuse for any more dither or delay."

Mr Corbyn demanded Mrs May answer three questions as he quizzed her over the latest Brexit negotiations.

He said: "One, does her deal still have the confidence of the Cabinet?

"Two, is Cabinet collective responsibility still in operation?

"Three, does it remain Government policy to avoid a no-deal outcome?"

Mrs May hit back at the Labour leader, accusing his party of having "no alternative" and putting its own interest ahead of the British people.

She answered the three questions he posed her during his response, replying: "Does the deal still have the confidence of the Cabinet? Yes.

"Does the Cabinet collective responsibility still apply? Yes.

"Does the Cabinet want to avoid no deal? Yes the Cabinet wants to make sure we leave the European Union with a good deal, and that is this deal."

The PM added: "The real indecision is the indecision at the heart of a Labour Party that has no plan and no alternative.

"And the national crisis is an opposition that is irresponsible, that puts its party interest first before the interests of the British people."

Belfast Telegraph


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