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Two-thirds back holding of border poll at some stage in future, survey finds


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Two-thirds of people here believe a border poll should be held at some point, according to a new poll

Two-thirds of people here believe a border poll should be held at some point, according to a new poll

Two-thirds of people here believe a border poll should be held at some point, according to a new poll

Two-thirds of people here believe a border poll should be held at some point, according to a new poll.

Results show 66% believe a vote should take place, with 37% wanting it within the next five years, and 29% wanting it at some point after that. Nearly a third (32%) said a border poll should never be held, while 2% were unsure.

And nearly a fifth of people said they would at least consider changing their vote to back Irish unity as a result of Brexit.

The poll was commissioned by BBC Northern Ireland for a Spotlight programme aired earlier this week.

Polling here was carried out amid loyalist street disorder between April 5 and 7, with 2,845 responses. In the Republic, polling took place between April 6 and 9 and 1,088 responses were analysed.

The second set of results from the programme showed 37% in the Republic backed a vote within the next five years, with 44% backing it at some point after that. Just 12% felt the vote should never be held, with 7% unsure.

Nearly a fifth (19%) here said they previously supported remaining in the UK, but had or would consider changing their mind because of Brexit.

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A total of 32% said they supported unity and Brexit had not affected this, while 1% said they had or would consider changing their mind on unity after Brexit, while 3% were unsure.

Respondents here were more willing to change some of the Republic's most distinctive cultural emblems in the event of unity compared to those living there.

Nearly half (46%) here felt Ireland should change its flag, compared to just 21% in the Republic. Those here backed changing the Irish national anthem by a majority of 57%, compared to 38% in the Republic.

People in the Republic (42%) were more in favour of retaining Stormont post-unity than those actually living under it (40%).

Changing the Republic's healthcare model to a system similar to the NHS with free access and no prescription charges was overwhelmingly backed by those living in the Republic (70%) and Northern Ireland (82%).

It was also felt by both cohorts that Scottish independence would make Irish unity more likely - 60% in Northern Ireland and 64% in the Republic.


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