| 3.9°C Belfast

Women in NI live on average 3.8 years longer than men

Life expectancy for males is 78.8 years and 82.6 for females

Close

Females live on average 3.8 years longer than males in NI (Jonathan Brady/PA)

Females live on average 3.8 years longer than males in NI (Jonathan Brady/PA)

PA Archive/PA Images

Females live on average 3.8 years longer than males in NI (Jonathan Brady/PA)

Women in Northern Ireland can expect to live close to four years longer than men, new figures show.

A man is expected to live until 78.8 years while it’s 82.6 years for females, similar to the previous figure for 2014-16, according to The Department of Health’s Life Expectancy in Northern Ireland 2017-19 report.

Both male and female life expectancy was highest in the Lisburn and Castlereagh area - 80.1 years (male) and 83.5 years (female) - and the lowest in Belfast at 76.1 and 81.0 respectively.

Male life expectancy has increased by 0.4 years from 78.3 years in 2013-15, while for females the increase was 0.3 years from 82.3 years over the same period.

Decreased mortality rates among 60-89 year olds has contributed to the majority of the increase in male life expectancy.

Reduced mortality from circulatory disease and cancer, among other causes, increased male life expectancy by 0.9 years. However this increase was offset by 0.5 years due to a rise in mortality for a range of causes, including non-traffic related accidents and other circulatory illness.

Compared with the previous five-year period (2009-11 to 2013-15), when male life expectancy increased by 0.9 years, improvements have slowed down.

This can largely be attributed to the reduction in mortality from circulatory disease being only 0.2 years compared with a reduction of 0.6 years in the previous period.

As with males, decreased mortality rates among 60-89 year olds in females has contributed to the majority of the increase in female life expectancy.

An improvement of 0.7 years in female life expectancy, mainly due to reduced mortality from circulatory disease and cancer, was offset by 0.4 years due to increased mortality from mental and behavioural disorders (mainly dementia) and non-traffic related accidents.

As with males, the positive contribution to female life expectancy since 2013-15 from reduced circulatory mortality was half that when compared with the previous period (2009-11 to 2013-15) when life expectancy increased by 0.4 years, however the overall improvements in life expectancy have remained similar.

In 2017-19, females in NI could expect to live 3.8 years longer than males, a decrease of 0.2 years since 2013-15.

Across all age groups, male mortality was higher than that of females, with the exception of those aged 0-9 where there was no difference in the levels of mortality.

Higher male mortality from circulatory disease and cancer accounted for 1.2 and 0.8 years of the gap respectively. Mortality from accidental causes was also higher among males and accounted for a further 0.5 years of the gender gap.

Belfast Telegraph


Top Videos



Privacy