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Face coverings become compulsory on public transport

One more coronavirus-related death has been confirmed in Ireland on Sunday, bringing the death toll to 1,735.

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A person wearing a protective face mask sits on a bus in Dublin (PA)

A person wearing a protective face mask sits on a bus in Dublin (PA)

A person wearing a protective face mask sits on a bus in Dublin (PA)

Face coverings will be compulsory on public transport from Monday as capacity on buses, trains and trams will increase from 20% to about 50%.

In conjunction with this move, face coverings will be compulsory on all public transport services.

Wearing a face covering in crowded situations such as public transport was already being strongly recommended.

At this stage, our focus and that of the operators is on education, awareness and giving our customers every encouragement to wear a face covering.Anne Graham

Anne Graham, CEO of the National Transport Authority, said people are being asked to do the right thing and exercise their personal responsibility.

She said: “This is an important part of efforts to build confidence in public transport as more people return to work over the coming weeks and months.

“At this stage, our focus and that of the operators is on education, awareness and giving our customers every encouragement to wear a face covering.”

One more Covid-19 death was confirmed in Ireland on Sunday, bringing the death toll to 1,735.

A further three cases of Covid-19 were confirmed, bringing the total number of confirmed cases to  25,439.

Validation of data resulted in the denotification of one confirmed case of Covid-19.

The HSE said it is working to identify any contacts the patients may have had to provide them with information and advice to prevent further spread.

Earlier, Professor Philip Nolan said the number of new travel-related Covid-19 cases is a “grave concern”.

Professor Nolan, chairman of the NPHET Irish epidemiological modelling advisory group, said people should question whether they need to take a foreign holiday this year due to the risk of a resurgence of the virus.

He tweeted: “New travel-related Covid-19 infections a grave concern. A surge seeded by travel is a risk to public health, to healthcare workers, to the vulnerable in our community. We can protect them by foregoing our holiday abroad. A useful question for any activity: luxury or necessity?”

Phase Three of the country’s reopening begins on Monday with hairdressers, barbers, gyms, pools, cinemas and churches returning after more than three months.

PA