| 18.7°C Belfast

Fine Gael, Fianna Fail and Greens on brink of deal to form government

The leaders of the three parties are at Government Buildings to formally agree a draft programme for government and to discuss outstanding issues.

Close

Fianna Fail leader Micheal Martin (centre) arrives at Government Buildings in Dublin (PA)

Fianna Fail leader Micheal Martin (centre) arrives at Government Buildings in Dublin (PA)

Fianna Fail leader Micheal Martin (centre) arrives at Government Buildings in Dublin (PA)

The leaders of Fine Gael, Fianna Fail and the Green Party are expected to formally sign off on a draft programme for government between their parties on Sunday night.

The parties were on Sunday evening edging towards agreement on forming a coalition government for the next five years, having overcome hurdles in the negotiations that have gone on for almost two months.

There are still outstanding issues between the parties that need to be resolved.

Fianna Fail has insisted that the pension age should not be increased to 67 until next year while Fine Gael has said taxes should not be increased for workers as the country faces a deep recession.

Close

(left to right) Tanaiste and Minister for Foreign Affairs Simon Coveney, Green Party leader Eamon Ryan and Minister for Finance and Public Expenditure and Reform Paschal Donohoe arrive at Government Buildings (Niall Carson/PA)

(left to right) Tanaiste and Minister for Foreign Affairs Simon Coveney, Green Party leader Eamon Ryan and Minister for Finance and Public Expenditure and Reform Paschal Donohoe arrive at Government Buildings (Niall Carson/PA)

PA

(left to right) Tanaiste and Minister for Foreign Affairs Simon Coveney, Green Party leader Eamon Ryan and Minister for Finance and Public Expenditure and Reform Paschal Donohoe arrive at Government Buildings (Niall Carson/PA)

A Green Party source said a ban on fracked gas imports would likely see deputy leader Catherine Martin backing the deal, which could help to persuade two thirds of its party members to approve the agreement.

The Green Party has the highest bar as their rules state that two thirds of their 2,700 members must support the deal.

Speaking ahead of their meeting, party leaders expressed confidence that they would on Sunday sign off on the draft agreement of a programme for government.

Fianna Fail leader Micheal Martin said that if the programme for government was signed off later, it would represent a new departure for Irish society.

Close

Fianna Fail leader Micheal Martin (centre) arrives at Government Buildings (Niall Carson/PA)

Fianna Fail leader Micheal Martin (centre) arrives at Government Buildings (Niall Carson/PA)

PA

Fianna Fail leader Micheal Martin (centre) arrives at Government Buildings (Niall Carson/PA)

Speaking on his way into Government Buildings, Mr Martin said that although there are outstanding issues to be resolved, he is hopeful a deal can be signed off on Sunday.

He said: “I think we can move this forward and it can represent a new departure for Irish society.

“It will bring transformative change to how we do things and prepare the country well for the next decade and prepare us for the economic situation that Covid-19 has created – that will take centre stage.”

Asked if the deal would be signed off on Sunday evening, he said: “That would be our intention, yes.

“If a programme for government is finally agreed, it will go to our parliamentary party first and then there will be a vote by the membership.”

It is expected that Mr Martin would become taoiseach for the first half of the new government’s term but he refused to be drawn about it.

Taoiseach and Fine Gael leader Leo Varadkar did not speak to the press on his way into the meeting.

Irish Government formation talks
Taoiseach Leo Varadkar at Government Buildings (Niall Carson/PA)


Close

Simon Coveney arrives at Government Buildings ( Niall Carson/PA)

Simon Coveney arrives at Government Buildings ( Niall Carson/PA)

PA

Simon Coveney arrives at Government Buildings ( Niall Carson/PA)

Deputy Fine Gael leader Simon Coveney said the draft coalition government deal was “good for the country”.

Mr Coveney, leader of the Fine Gael negotiating team, said: “We did a lot of good work last night and we effectively have a text for a government with a need for the leaders to finalise a very small number of issues.

“Negotiating teams have done their job. I think the text that will be going to the leaders today is good for the country and I hope and I am confident that the three leaders will be able to sell it within their parties and to the public.”

Negotiators from the parties met until the early hours of Sunday morning to agree what would go into the programme for government before it was presented to leaders this afternoon.

Green Party leader Eamon Ryan said a coalition government deal “needs to be done today”.

He said: “It does have to be done today because we are on a tight timeline. All of our parties have rules involving our members. With the pandemic, we have to send out postal ballots so our members can vote and that takes time.”

Close

Green Party leader Eamon Ryan is questioned as he arrives at Government Buildings (Niall Carson/PA)

Green Party leader Eamon Ryan is questioned as he arrives at Government Buildings (Niall Carson/PA)

PA

Green Party leader Eamon Ryan is questioned as he arrives at Government Buildings (Niall Carson/PA)

“We are conscious that laws around the Special Criminal Court have to be looked at at the end of June.

“There is also an economic imperative to try and get the recovery going with a government that has a mandate to do that.”

Health Minister and Fine Gael TD Simon Harris said the public are eager for a government to be in place soon and he is hoping for a breakthrough.

“It has been a long few intense weeks of negotiations – 127 days since the general election,” he told RTE’s Week In Politics programme.

“I think it is reaching a point where we need to get on with it and the public need a government.”

The programme for government could run to more than 100 pages. If agreed, it will then have to be put to the membership of each of the three parties for consideration.

If members pass it, a government could be in place for the end of June or early July.

PA