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Five more Covid-19 deaths in Ireland

More department stores fully reopened to the public on Wednesday following the Government’s announcement of a move to ‘Phase Two Plus’.

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Dr Tony Holohan (Brian Lawless/PA)

Dr Tony Holohan (Brian Lawless/PA)

Dr Tony Holohan (Brian Lawless/PA)

Another five people with Covid-19 have died in Ireland.

The toll has risen to 1,695, the National Public Health Emergency Team (NPHET) said.

The health system was notified of 19 more confirmed positive diagnoses of Covid-19 as of midnight Tuesday, bringing the total to more than 25,000.

The country is gradually unwinding from lockdown as the numbers infected fall.

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(PA Graphics)

(PA Graphics)

Press Association Images

(PA Graphics)

Dr Tony Holohan, chief medical officer at the Department of Health, said the NPHET will meet again on Thursday to review Ireland’s ongoing response to and preparedness for Covid-19.

It will also review updated World Health Organisation (WHO) guidance on face coverings and consider communications regarding appropriate use of face coverings in community settings.

Dr Ronan Glynn, deputy chief medical officer, said: “Our recovery rate is now at 92%.

“While it is very welcome that the vast majority of people who contracted Covid-19 have recovered from the acute phase of their illness, there are many who continue to experience longer-term effects including fatigue and decreased exercise capacity.”

There are 102 confirmed cases of Covid-19 in hospital. Of these, 29 are in intensive care.

Eager shoppers queued up to enter Arnotts and Brown Thomas department stores in Dublin on a rainy Wednesday.

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A woman carrying shopping bags leaves Brown Thomas on Grafton Street (Brian Lawless/PA)

A woman carrying shopping bags leaves Brown Thomas on Grafton Street (Brian Lawless/PA)

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A woman carrying shopping bags leaves Brown Thomas on Grafton Street (Brian Lawless/PA)

The stores fully reopened to the public on Wednesday following the Government’s announcement of a move to “Phase Two Plus”.

Virtually trying on make-up, steaming clothes and virtual queues – the first morning in Brown Thomas department store gave an insight into the future of retail.

A board displaying how many customers are in the store, hand sanitiser and signs asking customers to avoid touching stock are among the measures Brown Thomas is taking to ensure safety.

Valentina Fitzpatrick, from Italy but living in Dublin, said: “It’s like a celebration – we have only come back to normality so it is great to be able to come back out and see people and to finally have a sense that business is coming back.”

The reopening of marts earlier this week has led to a higher demand for animals compared with previous years while prices have remained stable, the head of the Irish Co-operative Organisation Society (ICOS) has said.

Ray Doyle, the livestock and environment executive of ICOS, which represents mart operators across Ireland, said that sales are almost 50% more than usual.

A Co Kildare mart opened its doors with reduced numbers and increased sanitation.

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Kilcullen livestock mart in Co Kildare (Niall Carson/PA)

Kilcullen livestock mart in Co Kildare (Niall Carson/PA)

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Kilcullen livestock mart in Co Kildare (Niall Carson/PA)

Creches and other childcare facilities are set to recommence on June 29, having closed in March.

A Government scheme will see a one-off reopening grant of 18 million euro for centre-based providers with operational costs and additional staffing costs, Children’s Minister Katherine Zappone said.

Earlier, Taoiseach Leo Varadkar said the Government will step up its campaign to show the public how to wear face masks properly.

Advice states face coverings should be worn on public transport, while visiting older people and in spaces where it is difficult to social distance.

Dr Cillian De Gascun, director of the National Virus Reference Lab, told RTE face coverings should be worn when physical distancing cannot be maintained.

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