Belfast Telegraph

Government’s Irish border solution in realms of science fiction, says SNP

Brexit minister Robin Walker was urged to give a date by which the Government will have brought forward a practical and credible solution.

The Government’s preferred solution to the border between Northern Ireland and the Republic belongs in the realms of science fiction, the SNP’s shadow Europe spokesman has claimed.

Peter Grant said ministers were “good at telling us what the Irish border won’t be” but that it was not clear what it would be like after Britain leaves the European Union.

During Brexit questions in the Commons, Mr Grant called on Brexit minister Robin Walker to give a date by which the Government will have brought forward a “practical” and “credible” solution.

The minister and his colleagues are very good at telling us what the Irish border won’t be - we’re still no closer to having any idea of what it will be Peter Grant, SNP

Mr Grant said: “The minister and his colleagues are very good at telling us what the Irish border won’t be – we’re still no closer to having any idea of what it will be.”

He said the group of questions on the border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland could have been linked to the previous one on the effect of leaving the EU on the UK space industry.

“The Government’s preferred solution still belongs in the realms of science fiction.

“If the minister can’t tell us when we will see this practical solution that they have promised as a priority, can he at least give us an end date, an absolute guarantee, by which as a matter of confidence the Government will have brought forward something that is practical or at the very least credible?”

Mr Walker replied: “These talks are continuing – we’re seeking to reach agreement on the full text of the withdrawal agreement by October this year as has been set out many times by both the Commission and the UK Government.”

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