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Leaving Cert grades three weeks late following pandemic disruption

Calculated grades are being issued for students who were unable to sit exams this year.

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This year’s Leaving Certificate grades will be published three weeks later than usual, education minister Norma Foley said (Niall Carson/PA).

This year’s Leaving Certificate grades will be published three weeks later than usual, education minister Norma Foley said (Niall Carson/PA).

This year’s Leaving Certificate grades will be published three weeks later than usual, education minister Norma Foley said (Niall Carson/PA).

This year’s Leaving Certificate grades will be published three weeks later than usual, education minister Norma Foley said.

Calculated grades are being issued for students who were unable to sit exams this year due to the coronavirus pandemic.

More than 450,000 individual results have to be prepared and checked before September 7.

Over 61,000 Leaving Certificate students are eligible to receive calculated grades.

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Education Minister Norma Foley said calculated grades offered a real way forward for young people (Niall Carson/PA).

Education Minister Norma Foley said calculated grades offered a real way forward for young people (Niall Carson/PA).

PA

Education Minister Norma Foley said calculated grades offered a real way forward for young people (Niall Carson/PA).

The minister said: “Putting in place an alternative for Leaving Certificate students, when it was impossible to run the Leaving Certificate examinations in the summer, has offered a real way forward for young people.”

Thousands of teachers and school leaders have worked in schools to provide estimated marks and other data to the Education Department.

The minister added: “Enormous care has been taken at school level to collect the information about students and to make sure that estimated marks are based on reliable evidence.

“Important checks were built in to ensure fairness, and teachers responded magnificently to the challenge.”

The purpose of the new system is to arrive at the grade that each student would have achieved if the examinations had taken place as normal and that the results are in line with previous years.

The minister added: “The people working on this are taking every precaution to ensure fairness so that students can receive the grades that reflect their work.

“This standardisation process at national level is essential for fairness and equity.

“It is really important to me that we deliver these calculated grades to the highest possible standards and that the outcomes are fair to students.

“The date of September 7 allows us to achieve this.”

PA