Belfast Telegraph

Limerick to have directly elected mayor but plan rejected in Cork and Waterford

Supporters said it would give a more democratic voice to the people, while critics said the cost would be a waste.

Members of the defence forces load ballots on to trucks in Ireland (Niall Carson/PA)
Members of the defence forces load ballots on to trucks in Ireland (Niall Carson/PA)

Voters in Cork and Waterford have rejected the plan to directly elect mayors but the proposal has passed in Limerick.

In Cork City Council area, 34,347 people voted against the proposal, while 33,364 voted in favour. 68,682 ballots were cast.

There were 21,718 Yes votes in Waterford City and County Council area, with 22,437 No votes. It equated to some 49.2% of people voting Yes, and 50.8% voting No.

In Limerick City and County Council area, 52.4% (or 38,122) voters backed the proposal, while 47.6% (or 34,573) voted against it.

Taoiseach Leo Varadkar welcomed the decision taken by Limerick voters but he said he was “sorry” it had narrowly failed in Waterford and Cork.

He tweeted: “Pleased that Limerick has voted to have Ireland’s first Directly Elected Mayor. Real opportunity for the city & county to get ahead.

“Will be backed by central government. Sorry it was narrowly defeated in Cork and Waterford. Dublin next.”

Under the Government’s plan, directly elected mayors would have more functions than they currently do and serve for a term of five years instead of one year.

Supporters of the proposal said it would give a more democratic voice to the people, while critics said the cost of the mayor’s office would be a waste of money.

PA

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