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Music in the pub and a crash course in GAA skills as royals charm Galway

Laughing Duchess Kate finds her efforts at hurling a bit hit... and miss

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The royal couple in Galway where they enjoyed a traditional session in a pub

The royal couple in Galway where they enjoyed a traditional session in a pub

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Kate tried her hand at hurling at Salthill Knocknacarra GAA Club

Kate tried her hand at hurling at Salthill Knocknacarra GAA Club

PA

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge

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The Duchess of Cambridge meets local Galwegians after a visit to a traditional Irish pub in Galway city centre on the third day of her visit to the Republic of Ireland. PA Photo. Picture date: Thursday March 5, 2020. See PA story ROYAL Cambridge. Photo credit should read: Aaron Chown/PA Wire

The Duchess of Cambridge meets local Galwegians after a visit to a traditional Irish pub in Galway city centre on the third day of her visit to the Republic of Ireland. PA Photo. Picture date: Thursday March 5, 2020. See PA story ROYAL Cambridge. Photo credit should read: Aaron Chown/PA Wire

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Crowds greet the royal couple in Galway

Crowds greet the royal couple in Galway

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The royal couple in Galway where they enjoyed a traditional session in a pub

It was third time lucky for the Duchess of Cambridge who - after two false dawns - pucked a goal to make Irish hurling legend DJ Carey proud.

If farming and Guinness weren't enough to cement the Irish experience, a traditional music session in popular pub Tig Cóilí as they celebrated Galway's year as the European Capital of Culture certainly did.

Onlookers, who began to gather at the barriers outside at 7am, let out a rapturous roar as the royals emerged blinking in the sunlight.

Renowned for its twice-daily traditional Irish music sessions, Tig Cóilí is a sought-after spot by both locals and tourists who come to sample Galway's unique cultural offering.

The couple were warmly received by owners Cóilí and Monica O'Flaherty, and Gary McMahon of Galway City Council, who presented them with a set of specially-commissioned Waterford Crystal glasses and a bottle of Midleton vintage whiskey.

In the pub which prides itself on having no TV, the couple enjoyed a traditional Irish music session.

Soon a picture of the royal couple will hang proudly on the wall beside such luminaries as Brendan Gleeson and Shane McGowan.

On the select guest list was a group of local students who recently were recognised for their work volunteering in the community at the Garda Youth Awards.

These included Jakub Kostanski (18), from Westside, who won the individual award, and Olga Spelman (18), of Corofin, who won the special achievement prize.

The royal couple left Tig Cóilí and generously greeted the welcoming crowd outside where they also spoke to schoolchildren from St Pat's primary school.

They then made their way to Salthill Knocknacarra GAA club where they wowed the waiting crowds with their good-humoured efforts at both Gaelic and hurling.

And their skills on the pitch were more than impressive, with Kate soloing and hopping across the pitch to jubilant cheers.

The pair took part in drills with the children and then competed against each other in a hurling shoot out.

The teams had three players each - Team Catherine comprised of the Duchess, Niamh McGauran (10) and Neasa Garvey (10). The Duke, Devon Burke (10) and Óisín Morrissey (10) made up Team William.

William appeared to take to hurling a little more fluidly than his wife, but it was the Duchess who managed the sink the sliotar in the back of the net, after twice failing to make contact.

The young players were quick to offer their support, shouting encouragement and tips. They roared: "Keep your eye on the ball."

Kate duly obliged and sent the leather spinning through the air and into the net. Next William was up, and with an admirable chip and bounce blasted the crossbar. Team Catherine was crowned the winner with a score of four to three.

Kate said how much she enjoyed herself and said she couldn't wait to come back.

Following a lengthy delay due to fog over Dublin, the royals had arrived in Galway behind schedule, shortly after 11am.

Earlier, at urban restaurant Tribeton, the Duke showed off his juggling skills, taking his cue from Galway Community Circus.

Trish Rowe from Galway city, who waited over four hours insisted it was well worth the wait. "We're delighted to welcome them here to Galway. It is a great privilege," she said.

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