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No further Covid deaths in Ireland

A rapid reduction in case counts and numbers in hospital have been observed, public health doctors said.

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(Niall Carson/PA)

(Niall Carson/PA)

(Niall Carson/PA)

No further deaths with Covid-19 were reported in Ireland on Monday.

A rapid reduction in case counts and numbers in hospital has been observed, public health doctors said.

The case tally is falling approximately 3% a day, Professor Philip Nolan added.

He said: “We are seeing sustained progress in suppressing transmission, perhaps even accelerated progress in suppression.”

Another 437 infections were confirmed.

As of 8am, 418 Covid-19 patients were in hospital, with 103 in intensive care.

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Prof Nolan added: “We are at a case count a little under 500 cases per day. That remains very high but it is very significant progress from a week ago.”

Dr Cliona Murphy, chairwoman of the Institute of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, said there was no evidence that taking any of the vaccines affected a woman’s ability to conceive.

There is emerging research showing an effect on men’s fertility in the period after he has suffered an infection, she added.

Prof Nolan warned of the danger of the disease bouncing back if people let down their guards.

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Professor Philip Nolan (Brian Lawless/PA).

Professor Philip Nolan (Brian Lawless/PA).

PA

Professor Philip Nolan (Brian Lawless/PA).

“We need to be immensely careful that the level we have succeeded in getting Covid-19 to does not turn around and bite us.”

Deputy chief medical officer Dr Ronan Glynn said the progress could turn around in a matter of weeks and that had been seen in other countries.

“We have made more progress in the last fortnight than any other country in Europe.”

He raised concerns over the number of outbreaks among travelling communities in the Midlands.

He said research showed compliance with the key public health measures remain very high, with washing hands regularly at 93%, using hand sanitiser at 95% and social distancing in a queue at 93%.

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Dr Ronan Glynn (Julien Behal Photography/PA)

Dr Ronan Glynn (Julien Behal Photography/PA)

PA

Dr Ronan Glynn (Julien Behal Photography/PA)

The deputy chief medical officer added: “While levels of anxiety (36%) and boredom (38%) are understandably high, it is encouraging to see that a sense of hope continues to rise across the population, with 48% of people reporting that they feel the worst of the pandemic is behind us.

“This hope is justified in the context of the continued improvement in the key indicators of the disease and with the ongoing rollout of the vaccination programme over the coming weeks.

“However, it is vital that this hope does not give way to complacency; across Europe countries are seeing a deteriorating picture and our own disease incidence remains high – we must do all we can to continue to suppress this virus and to ensure that as many people as possible get to benefit from vaccination over the coming months.

“Keep your guard up and hold firm.”


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