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Quake felt in Donegal and Galway

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This image, reproduced by permission of the British Geological Survey, shows the location of the earthquake off the Welsh coast

This image, reproduced by permission of the British Geological Survey, shows the location of the earthquake off the Welsh coast

PA

This image, reproduced by permission of the British Geological Survey, shows the seismogram of the North Wales earthquake

This image, reproduced by permission of the British Geological Survey, shows the seismogram of the North Wales earthquake

PA

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This image, reproduced by permission of the British Geological Survey, shows the location of the earthquake off the Welsh coast

An earthquake off the coast of Wales has been felt in several counties of south-east of Ireland.

The Irish National Seismic Network (INSN) said its seismic stations in Valentia off the south-west coast, Donegal and Galway all recorded the earthquake.

Tom Blake, INSN director and from the school of cosmic physics in the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, said there has been a significant increase in seismic activity in the area in recent months.

"It is unlikely that the magnitude of the earthquake will be exceeded in the Irish Sea in the coming days but aftershocks can be expected in the hours and days ahead, although many will be too weak to be felt," he said.

People in Wales were woken by the quake which happened at around 4.15am and was felt as far away as Merseyside.

The epicentre was 13km north west of the town of Abersoch, Gwynedd, on the Lleyn Peninsula and measured a magnitude of 3.8, the British Geological Survey (BGS) said. Some 180 reports from people who felt the earthquake have been made to the BGS, who said the majority were within a 50 to 75km radius.

Assistant seismologist Julian Bukits of the BGS said: "This was the biggest in the area since a 4.3 in August 1984, which was an aftershock to the 5.4 earthquake in July 1984, which was the biggest on shore earthquake in the UK ever. An earthquake of 3.8 magnitude might occur once every 12 to 18 months. It was felt in the Isle of Man to the north, Southport to the north east, and the east coast of Ireland to the west."

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Mr Bukits said the quake, the epicentre of which was at a depth of 8km, was not big enough to cause damage. "People were woken from their sleep and have described the shaking as moderate," he said. "They described the shaking as a trembling feeling. People reported windows and crockery rattling."


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