| 13.3°C Belfast

Sinn Fein unveils job creation plan

Close

Sinn Fein has pledged to create more than 50,000 jobs in Dublin and save another 45,000 if elected to government

Sinn Fein has pledged to create more than 50,000 jobs in Dublin and save another 45,000 if elected to government

Sinn Fein has pledged to create more than 50,000 jobs in Dublin and save another 45,000 if elected to government

Sinn Fein has pledged to create more than 50,000 jobs in Dublin and save another 45,000 if elected to government.

The party set out proposals to support businesses in the capital, including reforming local authority rates, freezing utility charges and forcing landlords to allow tenants to renegotiate rents to lower rates.

Sean Crowe, Dublin South-West candidate, claimed the proposals were radical, practical and different.

"Among them is the call for more support to small and local businesses which form the backbone of many inner-city communities," Mr Crowe said.

Priority should not only be given to large manufacturers or factories, he added.

"Simple support like ensuring small businesses have access to credit or making sure local authority rates are not crippling them and protecting people's incomes so they have disposable wages are simple measures which if taken, would make a world of difference."

Other proposals in the plan include examining insurance costs and ensuring greater regulation, overhauling Dublin local authorities and establishing a "Jobs not Welfare" fund to subsidise workers in struggling small businesses.

Daily Headlines & Evening Telegraph Newsletter

Receive today's headlines directly to your inbox every morning and evening, with our free daily newsletter.

This field is required

The party would also develop two new city cultural quarters, including one commemorating 1916 around the area of the GPO and Moore Street.

An Irish language quarter would also be established, with both projects costing 50 million euro and creating 500 tourism-related jobs.

Sinn Fein would also introduce a scheme to get people in professions worst hit by the recession back into education, including architecture, conveyancing and solicitors, while the civil service recruitment ban would be lifted in the gardai, education, health and social welfare.


Top Videos



Privacy