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Teams urged to hold virtual training and raise money for cystic fibrosis support

Ireland has the highest incidence in the world per head of its indigenous population.

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Virtual training sessions are being encouraged (Andrew Matthews/PA)

Virtual training sessions are being encouraged (Andrew Matthews/PA)

Virtual training sessions are being encouraged (Andrew Matthews/PA)

GAA, rugby and soccer teams have been urged to take part in virtual training sessions to raise money for cystic fibrosis support.

Ireland has the highest incidence in the world per head of its indigenous population, with more than 1,400 people living with the degenerative lung and digestive system condition.

Sixty Five Roses Day gets its name from the way children often first say the words “cystic fibrosis”.

Bernie Martin’s eight-year-old Eva-Rose has the condition.

She said: “65 Roses Day is very special to us.

“I’d love for people to really get behind it to remind people with cystic fibrosis that they’re not alone and that they’re doing brilliantly.

“If we get good support, it will raise spirits, and that boost is just as important as raising funds right now.”

Dublin GAA footballer Ciaran Kilkenny, Republic of Ireland and Sheffield United player, John Egan, and Ireland rugby player, Louise Galvin, are lending their support to the virtual launch of Cystic Fibrosis Ireland’s annual flagship fundraising appeal, 65 Roses Day, taking place on Friday April 9.

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Louise Galvin is encouraging participation (Nigel French/PA)

Louise Galvin is encouraging participation (Nigel French/PA)

PA

Louise Galvin is encouraging participation (Nigel French/PA)

The trio are urging people to undertake a virtual 65 Roses Team Challenge.

This can be any 65-themed challenge, like a 6.5K walk/run, 65,000 steps, a 65K cycle.

While teams cannot train due to current restrictions, this challenge gives members the chance to get together and train virtually wearing their team colours while raising much-needed funds to help people with cystic fibrosis, the charity said.

The impact of cystic fibrosis can vary from one person to another.

Some live until their teens and others live in to their 50s.

Ireland has three times the rate of the United States and the rest of the European Union.

PA


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