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Three further deaths with Covid-19 reported in Ireland

A further 525 positive cases of the virus were also notified on Sunday.

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A man walks past a mural in Dublin by St John Bosco Youth Centre recognising the ongoing efforts of Ireland’s frontline services during the coronavirus pandemic (Brian Lawless/PA)

A man walks past a mural in Dublin by St John Bosco Youth Centre recognising the ongoing efforts of Ireland’s frontline services during the coronavirus pandemic (Brian Lawless/PA)

A man walks past a mural in Dublin by St John Bosco Youth Centre recognising the ongoing efforts of Ireland’s frontline services during the coronavirus pandemic (Brian Lawless/PA)

Three more people have died with Covid-19 in Ireland.

A further 525 positive cases of the virus were also notified on Sunday.

The figures came as 423 Covid-19 patients remained in hospital, with 103 being treated in intensive care units.

Most of the latest cases (214) were detected in Dublin, with 37 in Meath, 28 in Offaly, 28 in Limerick and 25 in Wicklow, with the remaining 193 cases spread across 19 other counties.

This week will see the extension of the national vaccination programme to people considered at high risk due to serious illness.

Over the weekend, Ireland hit the milestone of doses of the vaccination being administered to half a million people.

However, Northern Ireland’s First Minister Arlene Foster has expressed concern at the pace of the vaccination programme in the Republic.

“There will have to be conversations about how we move forward in this,” she told RTE Radio’s This Week programme.

Mrs Foster said Stormont’s chief medical officer Dr Michael McBride has made it clear that if a lot of people are coming to Northern Ireland who are not vaccinated it “could have an impact on the efficacy” of the vaccine on those who have received it.

She said that so far Stormont has advised people to be sensible rather than issue a ban on crossing the border.

“That’s something we haven’t done unlike the Republic, we have never had that rule, we have tried to say to people to be sensible and not move between different jurisdictions during the different lockdowns,” she said.

“But I think we want to take advice from our medical experts on all of these issues.”

Meanwhile, President Michael D Higgins has signed a Bill into law which provides for the mandatory quarantine of people entering the state from certain areas to prevent the spread of Covid-19.

Health Minister Stephen Donnelly described it as “another important element of Ireland’s defence against Covid-19”.

He said the next step will be to finalise and sign a contract with a service provider which he anticipates will happen “shortly”.

PA


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