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Varadkar urges Greens to enter formal coalition talks

Leo Varadkar said it was likely to be June when a government was formed.

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Taoiseach Leo Varadkar is trying to form a new government (PA)

Taoiseach Leo Varadkar is trying to form a new government (PA)

Taoiseach Leo Varadkar is trying to form a new government (PA)

The Taoiseach has urged the Greens to enter formal coalition talks as he expressed a willingness to meet their carbon emissions target.

Leo Varadkar, who said he did not think a new government will be formed until June at the earliest, said Ireland’s economic recovery from Covid-19 could be “green not brown”.

Following February’s inconclusive election, Fine Gael and Fianna Fail are courting the Greens, Labour and the Social Democrats as potential junior partners in a three or four party coalition.

The Greens’ pre-condition of only entering a government committed to a 7% reduction in carbon emissions has emerged as a potential deal breaker.

On RTE’s Late Late Show, Mr Varadkar said he hoped another election could be avoided.

The current government is functioning well at the moment but can’t go on like this forever.Leo Varadkar

He said he was keen to meet the 7% target but said it had to be done with the buy-in of the farming and business communities.

“I am someone who believes and accepts we need to be more ambitious when it comes to climate action,” he said.

“We’re very keen to meet that 7% target.

“We really want to sit down with them and work out how that can be done, but I think one of the things that has emerged that there are people, a lot of our farmers, people in rural Ireland, who are a little bit worried about what climate action might mean for them and their livelihoods and their business, a lot of people in the business community too who are worried about carbon tax and haulage and so on.

“We need to see more ambitious climate action as an opportunity, as an opportunity to remake agriculture, to give much better and secure incomes to our farmers for diversifying; creating lots of jobs around retrofit for example; becoming a net exporter of energy – so instead of importing all that oil and gas, exporting our wind power to other parts of the word.

“So climate action can actually be a big economy success story for Ireland. We can have a recovery that’s green not brown. That means bringing rural Ireland, bringing farmers, bringing the business community with us.”

Mr Varadkar said a Fine Gael, Fianna Fail and Green alliance would be the right political mix to achieve that consensus.

“We are the parties that can do that, whereas a left-wing government they would be fighting with business and fighting with employers, it wouldn’t work,” he said.

Mr Varadkar said it was unlikely a government could be formed in May, because even if a coalition deal was struck, all the parties would then have to seek the endorsement of their respective memberships.

“I think we could have a new government in June,” he said.

“I really hope we do by the way, because the country actually needs it.

“The current government is functioning well at the moment but can’t go on like this forever, we’re making decisions at the moment without a parliamentary mandate in many ways.”

PA