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Burglar father vows to obey the law

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Burglar Wayne Bishop who was freed on appeal to look after his children has promised not to get in trouble again

Burglar Wayne Bishop who was freed on appeal to look after his children has promised not to get in trouble again

Burglar Wayne Bishop who was freed on appeal to look after his children has promised not to get in trouble again

A burglar who was freed from jail on appeal so he could look after his five children has vowed not to get into trouble again.

Wayne Bishop, 33, from Clifton, Nottingham, told ITV's Daybreak: "I was on top of the world that I was being released to look after my children.

"I'm not going to get into trouble any more. I'm not doing anything wrong to break the law. I've been given a chance and I'm not going to take liberty."

Bishop was jailed for eight months after admitting a burglary at Mansfield rugby club and an offence of dangerous driving, but he argued the judgment breached his human rights and not enough consideration was given to the plight of his children.

On Friday the Court of Appeal in London ruled his prison sentence should be suspended.

Bishop, who has previous convictions for theft and driving while disqualified, said it was a "spur of the moment" crime, telling the programme: "It's not a big crime, I haven't murdered anyone. It was a commercial burglary." But he added: "There are victims of every crime and I've said that I've got sympathy for the victims."

The appeal judges were told that before being jailed Bishop looked after the children - aged between five and 13 - throughout the week and his ex-partner had them at weekends.

Suspending the sentence, the judges imposed a 12-month supervision requirement, a curfew for three months between 10pm and 6am, and also directed that Bishop completes a "thinking skills" programme.

Former Metropolitan Police commander Brian Paddick told the programme: "If people can just say I'm not going to go to prison because I've got children to look after then it sets a very dangerous precedent.

"And what example does it set to the children if they believe they can go out and commit offences and not be punished for it. It's not a good example to set to anybody. It looks like the authority of the police is being undermined by the courts."

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