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Cameron to press G8 on aid promises

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French president Nicolas Sarkozy and his wife Carla Bruni greet Prime Minister David Cameron

French president Nicolas Sarkozy and his wife Carla Bruni greet Prime Minister David Cameron

US president Barack Obama passes David Cameron during the internet session of the G8 summit

US president Barack Obama passes David Cameron during the internet session of the G8 summit

David Cameron and French president Nicolas Sarkozy arrive for the G8 Summit

David Cameron and French president Nicolas Sarkozy arrive for the G8 Summit

French president Nicolas Sarkozy and his wife Carla Bruni greet Prime Minister David Cameron

Britain will urge world leaders to make good on aid promises after warning that failing to help fledgling democracies could create more immigration and extremism.

The speech came as the G8 leaders announced at their annual summit that international development banks will give £12 billion to Egypt and Tunisia to support pro-democratic reforms.

In a statement the eight leaders said that their countries will also "mobilise substantial bilateral support to scale-up this effort". The statement did not provide breakdowns of what aid each G8 country would provide.

The leaders encouraged other countries, including rich Arab world nations, to contribute as well to shoring up economies in Egypt and Tunisia, where Arab Spring uprisings this year overthrew dictators but also scared away tourists and investors.

David Cameron is expected to deliver a pointed reminder at the summit of the target to give 0.7% of GDP by 2015.

While the coalition has defied concerns from the Tory right to keep the UK on track to meet the goal, other nations are lagging.

The first day of the gathering in France on Thursday was dominated by discussion of the Arab Spring and situation in Libya.

Mr Cameron had called on the G8 to demonstrate it was "on the side" of countries implementing reforms by making concrete pledges of aid.

He announced that the UK was allocating £110 million over four years to strengthen justice systems, cut corruption, encourage political parties, and broaden economic opportunities.

PA