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Caution urged as Eid coincides with easing of restrictions

The annual festival is due to take place next week, as most legal restrictions are lifted in England.

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Eid is due to start early next week (PA)

Eid is due to start early next week (PA)

Eid is due to start early next week (PA)

Muslims are being encouraged to continue to get vaccinated, take coronavirus tests and wear masks where possible as they celebrate Eid next week, when many coronavirus restrictions will also be lifted.

Charities and health bodies have called for caution ahead of the Islamic celebration, which is due to start early next week, dependent on sightings of the moon.

It coincides with the lifting of most legal restrictions in England on Monday.

Muslims typically mark the festival by visiting mosques for special prayers, and sharing meals with family and friends.

I would urge that Eid ul Adha celebrations are again limited, the last thing we want is for festivities to become super spreader eventsDr Hina Shahid, Muslim Doctors Association

But as cases rise and restrictions are further eased, they are being urged to celebrate in a limited way.

Dr Hina Shahid, chairwoman of the Muslim Doctors Association, said: “I encourage everyone to get vaccinated so they can feel safer celebrating Eid with their loved ones.

“Both indoor and outdoor celebrations could potentially impact Muslim families and individuals so I would urge that Eid ul Adha celebrations are again limited, the last thing we want is for festivities to become super spreader events.

“There remain increased risks from Covid-19 infection in the community and in light of evidence of increasing transmission, there needs to be a sensible approach in celebrations, minimising risks to vulnerable people, continuing with hand and respiratory hygiene and wearing face masks in crowded places.”

Dr Habib Naqvi, director of the NHS Race and Health Observatory, said keeping well throughout the celebrations will mean “adapting usual religious and cultural practices”.

He continued: “This is particularly important for protecting vulnerable people who are shielding because of underlying health conditions as well as family, friends and carers of those who are most vulnerable.

“Asian and black communities remain particularly vulnerable and disproportionately affected by the Covid-19 virus.

“The wide mixing of households and people of all ages, without restrictions, means this risk sadly remains.”

We know that a lot of Muslim families live with elderly parents or grandparents so it is important we keep them in our thoughts when attending Eid celebrations throughout the weekTufail Hussain, Islamic Relief

Islamic Relief called for worshippers to be mindful of the daily rising cases and adhere to guidelines suggested by the Muslim Council of Britain.

This “ideally means avoiding hugging, resisting praying shoulder to shoulder and wearing a mask where possible”, said charity director Tufail Hussain.

He added: “We know that a lot of Muslim families live with elderly parents or grandparents so it is important we keep them in our thoughts when attending Eid celebrations throughout the week, especially if we are planning on attending larger-scale events, where there might be a higher chance of catching Covid.”

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