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Hungry hedgehog rescued after getting into prickly predicament

The unfortunate hedgehog was trapped by his own spines in a discarded bird feeder.

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The hedgehog got stuck in a bird feeder (RSPCA/PA)

The hedgehog got stuck in a bird feeder (RSPCA/PA)

The hedgehog got stuck in a bird feeder (RSPCA/PA)

A hedgehog found himself in quite the prickly predicament after going in search of a snack, and getting stuck.

The spiky creature crawled inside a discarded bird feeder in the hopes of scoring a tasty treat but could not get out.

Lying helpless in a garden in Horsham, West Sussex, the hedgehog was rescued by the RSPCA last week, the charity announced on Thursday.

RSPCA inspector Tony Woodley, who sprang to the aid of the spiny visitor, said: “The poor little hog had pushed his way right into the middle of a long, metal-wire feeder and found himself stuck in the narrow tube, his spines wedging him in.

“The caller had spotted him that morning but wasn’t sure how long he’d been there for.

“Thankfully, I managed to cut the wire, remove a section of the feeder and peel it back so I could carefully free the hedgehog. I checked him over for any injuries but was pleased that he didn’t seem too worse for wear.”

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The small creature was cut free in situ (RSPCA/PA)

The small creature was cut free in situ (RSPCA/PA)

PA

The small creature was cut free in situ (RSPCA/PA)

Mr Woodley decided to release the hedgehog in situ so he could make his way back to his home.

He urged people to keep an eye on all wildlife feeders in their gardens to make sure animals and birds do not get stuck or injured.

The charity’s officers are often called out to greedy squirrels who get themselves stuck in feeders – and have also been called to help trapped birds and rodents.

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And made its own way back to the undergrowth in Horsham, West Sussex (RSPCA/PA)

And made its own way back to the undergrowth in Horsham, West Sussex (RSPCA/PA)

PA

And made its own way back to the undergrowth in Horsham, West Sussex (RSPCA/PA)

Mr Woodley added: “I would urge people who use feeders to check them regularly to look out for any trapped wildlife and to remove them if you’re going away and can’t monitor them daily.”

If you encounter an animal caught in a bird feeder, do not try to free them yourself as you may risk hurting the animal or yourself, the charity says.

Instead, monitor the situation at a distance and call the RSPCA emergency line on 0300 1234 999.

PA