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Jack Straw to face Leveson next week

Former home secretary Jack Straw will give evidence to the Leveson Inquiry next week as it focuses on relationships between the press and politicians.

Mr Straw, who also served as justice secretary, will appear at the inquiry into press standards on Wednesday.

The first part of the inquiry, looking at the culture, practices and ethics of the press in general, is moving into its third module, on relationships between the press and politicians.

Last week eight Cabinet ministers - including Prime Minister David Cameron, Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg and Culture Secretary Jeremy Hunt - were granted "core participant" status in the inquiry, giving them the right to see documents and statements in advance.

They are all expected to give evidence to the inquiry, as well as former prime ministers Tony Blair and Gordon Brown.

Emails released earlier in the inquiry prompted calls for the resignation of Culture Secretary Jeremy Hunt.

The emails, sent by News Corp lobbyist Frederic Michel, led to claims Mr Hunt secretly backed the Murdochs' BSkyB takeover bid.

But during opening statements into the third module yesterday, Lord Justice Leveson said he would not be ruling on whether Mr Hunt had breached the ministerial code.

Tony Blair's former spin doctor Alastair Campbell, who has already given evidence in a previous module, is to take to the witness box on Monday, along with former cabinet secretary Lord O'Donnell.

Sky News political editor Adam Boulton and former PCC chairman Lord Wakeham will appear on Tuesday.

On Thursday the inquiry will hear from Sir Harold Evans, editor of The Sunday Times from 1967 to 1981, as well as Peter Oborne, the Daily Telegraph's chief political commentator.

It is expected that former prime ministers Tony Blair and Gordon Brown, as well as Mr Cameron, will give evidence during this module of the inquiry.

Mr Cameron set up the Leveson Inquiry last July in response to revelations that the now-defunct News of the World hacked murdered schoolgirl Milly Dowler's phone after she disappeared in 2002.

The first part of the inquiry, sitting at the Royal Courts of Justice in London, is looking at the culture, practices and ethics of the Press in general and is due to produce a report by October.



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