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New IRA admit responsibility for letter bombs sent to London and Glasgow

An improvised explosive device (IED) which was sent to The Compass Centre, Heathrow (Metropolitan Police/PA)
An improvised explosive device (IED) which was sent to The Compass Centre, Heathrow (Metropolitan Police/PA)
Mark Edwards

By Mark Edwards

The new IRA has admitted responsibility for a number of explosive devices planted in buildings across London and Glasgow last week.

The Irish News received the claim from someone using a recognised code word.

The Metropolitan Police said it was aware of the claim, which was made on behalf of a group calling itself the "IRA".

The claim indicated that five devices were sent, but only four have been located.

A Met Police spokesman said: "The investigations into these devices continue and relevant enquiries are being made in relation to the claim that has been made.

"Given the packages received last week bore similarities to devices sent in the past which were linked to dissident groups associated with Northern Ireland-related terrorism, officers were already looking at this as a line of enquiry. However, we continue to keep an open mind and enquiries continue.

"We are also aware that those claiming responsibility have indicated five devices were sent. At this time, only four devices have been recovered."

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Police at Waterloo after a small parcel bomb was found (John Stillwell/PA Wire)

It is understood some of the packages may have been sent from Dublin.

Timeline of incidents:

On Tuesday March 5, at around 9.55am, the Met Police received a report of a suspicious package at The Compass Centre, nelson Road, Hounslow. The package was opened by staff at the building, causing the device to initiate. This resulted in part of the package burning. No one was injured. The building was evacuated as a precaution. Specialist officers attended and made the device safe.

The Compass Centre is not within Heathrow Airport and flights were not affected.

On the same day, at around 11.40am, British transport Police were called to reports of a suspicious package in the post room at Waterloo Station. The package was not opened. Specialist officers attended and made the device safe. No one was injured.

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Where the devices were found

The station was not evacuated, however cordons were erected in a small area of Cab Road outside the station.

At around 12.10pm police were then called to reports of a suspicious package at offices at City Aviation House, Royal Docks, Newham.

Staff were evacuated from the building as a precaution. The package was not opened and no one was injured. Specialist officers attended and made safe the device. Flights to and from the airport were not affected.

On March 6, a suspicious package was received at the University of Glasgow. The package was not opened and no one was injured. The emergency services were alerted and several buildings within the estate were evacuated as a precaution. Specialist officers subsequently carried out a controlled explosion of the device.

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An improvised explosive device (IED) sent to City Aviation House, London City Airport (Metropolitan Police/PA)

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