Belfast Telegraph

Home News UK

Norway accused Anders Breivik 'linked to British far right group'

Anders Breivik
Anders Breivik
Medics and emergency workers escort an injured person from a camp site on the island of Utoya (AP)
Smoke rises from central Oslo after an explosion ripped through government buildings (AP/Scanpix)
Smoke rises from central Oslo after an explosion ripped through government buildings (AP/Scanpix)
A victim is treated outside government buildings in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2010, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents.(AP Photo/Fartein Rudjord)
Medics and emergency workers escort youths from a camp site on the island of Utoya, Norway Saturday July 23, 2011. A Norwegian dressed as a police officer gunned down at least 84 people at an island retreat, police said Saturday. Investigators are still searching the surrounding waters, where people fled the attack, which followed an explosion in nearby Oslo that killed seven. (AP Photo/Morten Edvardsen/Scanpix
An aerial view of Utoya Island, Norway taken Thursday, July 21, 2011
An injured woman is helped by a passerby, in a doorway in Oslo, Norway, Friday July 22, 2011, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents and debris. The Prime Minister is not hurt
Two women are seen leaving as rescue workers arrive to help the injured following an explosion in Oslo, Norway Friday July 22, 2011
Medics and emergency workers escort an injured person from a camp site on the island of Utoya, Norway Saturday July 23, 2011. A Norwegian dressed as a police officer gunned down at least 84 people at an island retreat, police said Saturday. Investigators are still searching the surrounding waters, where people fled the attack, which followed an explosion in nearby Oslo that killed seven
A tracked high speed mist fan is used to drag a damaged vehicle away from a building in central Oslo, Friday July 22, 2011, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents
The wreckage of a car lies outside a building in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2010, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents and debris. A loud explosion shattered windows Friday at the government headquarters in Oslo which includes the prime minister's office, injuring several people. Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg is safe, government spokeswoman Camilla Ryste told The Associated Press
A victim is treated outside government buildings in the center of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2011, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents. (AP Photo/Fartein Rudjord)
In this image taken from TV smoke and flames billow from the shattered window of a building after an explosion in Oslo, Norway, Friday July 22, 2011. A loud explosion shattered windows Friday in several buildings including the government headquarters in Oslo which includes the prime minister's office, injuring several people. Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg is safe, government spokeswoman Camilla Ryste told The Associated Press
The wreckagew of a car lies outside a building in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2010, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents.(AP Photo/Roald Berit, Scanpix, Norway)
An officer responds in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2010, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents and debris
The scene after an explosion in Oslo, Norway, Friday July 22, 2011
The wreckage of a car lies outside government buildings in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2011, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering wiondows and covering the street with documents
Devastation caused after a powerful blast tore open several buildings (Holm Morten)
An aerial view of Utoya Island, where a Labour Party youth camp was attacked by a gunman (AP)
A woman walks through debris in a street following an explosion in Oslo, Norway Friday July 22, 2011. A powerful blast tore open several Oslo buildings including the prime minister's office on Friday
Victims receive treatment outside government buildings in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2010, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office
The scene after an explosion in Oslo, Norway, Friday July 22, 2011
Smoke rises from the central area of Oslo Friday, July 22, 2011 after an explosion. Terrorism ravaged long-peaceful Norway on Friday when a bomb ripped open buildings including the prime minister's office and a man dressed as a police officer opened fire at a nearby island youth camp. (AP Photo/Scanpix, Jon Bredo Overaas)
Wounded people are treated in the street in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2010, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents and debris

Police investigating Norway's bomb attack and mass shooting are thought to be probing the suspect's possible links to the British far right.

Detectives have been examining the background of Anders Breivik, who reportedly claimed he was recruited by two English right-wing extremists at a meeting in the UK in 2002 attended by seven other people.

The 32-year-old is due to appear in court charged with terrorism following the blast in central Oslo and gun attack at a youth camp on the island of Utoya on Friday that claimed at least 93 lives.

Breivik's lawyer said his client had wanted to revolutionise Norway's society and had "confessed to the factual circumstances" of the atrocities but denied criminal responsibility.

Meanwhile David Cameron and the Government's top security advisers will discuss Britain's vulnerability to a Norway-style terrorist attack when the Prime Minister chairs a meeting of the National Security Council on Monday morning. Scotland Yard said it was liaising with the Norwegian authorities and an officer had gone to the country to help with the inquiry.

As Breivik's possible ties with British extremists were explored, it emerged he had published a manifesto online on Friday railing against Muslim immigration to Europe and vowing revenge on "indigenous Europeans" whom he accused of betraying their heritage. He added that they would be punished for their "treasonous acts". He identified a British mentor called Richard in the 1,500-page polemic.

Asked if the Norwegian police were considering possible links to British far-right groups, a police spokesman said: "I'm sure they will do. They are following every lead and they're checking out everything he might have been associated with."

It was too early to say which groups this might include, he added. Reports suggested Breivik had connections and sympathies with the right-wing English Defence League (EDL).

But the EDL denied that the suspect had any links with it and said it "vehemently" opposed his actions. In a statement on its website the group wrote: "Terrorism and extremism of any kind is never acceptable and we pride ourselves on opposing these...

"We strongly oppose extremism and always reject any suggestion of us being either extremists or far-right, due to our great past record of dealing with anyone who holds such extremist views."

Press Association

Popular

From Belfast Telegraph