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Philip's many different titles

The Duke of Edinburgh is already a Knight of the Order of the Elephant in Denmark, a Royal Chief of the Order of Logohu in Papua New Guinea and a Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Netherlands Lion.

At the Queen's side for more than 67 years, Philip has, along the way, notched up scores of foreign knighthoods, decorations and honorary degrees.

He is also a Knight of the Garter, a Knight of the Thistle, a Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the British Empire, an Earl, a Baron and the Lord High Admiral of the Royal Navy.

His latest award - Knight of the Order of Australia - is just one in a long line of dozens of accolades.

He was made a Knight Grand Cross with Brilliants of the Order of the Sun by Peru in 1962 and was awarded the Collar of the Order of the Queen of Sheba by Ethiopia in 1954 and the Collar of the Order of the Aztec Eagle by Mexico in 1964, among many others.

He was made a member of the Order of the Superior Sun by Afghanistan in 1971 and has been a member of Brunei's Family Order since 1972.

Philip is also a Freeman of the cities of Acapulco; Belfast; Bridgetown; Cardiff; Dar-es-Salam; Edinburgh; Glasgow; Guadalajara; London; Los Angeles; Melbourne and Nairobi.

The Duke's full title is listed on the British monarchy website as: "HRH The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, Earl of Merioneth and Baron Greenwich, KG (Knight of the Garter), KT (Knight of the Thistle), OM (Order of Merit), GBE (Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the British Empire), AC (Companion of the Order of Australia), QSO (Companion of The Queen's Service Order), PC (Privy Counsellor)".

His new Australian honour now gives him the letters "AK" (Knight of the Order of Australia) which is likely to appear instead of the AC (Companion of the Order of Australia) - being a higher ranking award.

Philip was appointed a Companion of the Order of Australia (military division) during Australia's bicentenary in 1988.

The Prince of Wales has been a Knight of the Order of Australia for 34 years since 1981.

Shortly before his marriage to Princess Elizabeth on 20 November, 1947, Philip was given the titles of The Duke of Edinburgh, Earl of Merioneth and Baron Greenwich by the Queen's father George VI.

The King also made Philip a Knight of the Order of the Garter in 1947. It is the most senior and oldest British Order of Chivalry, having been founded in the 14th century by Edward III.

Five years later the Queen made the Duke a Knight of the Thistle, the highest honour in Scotland.

That same year the Duke was granted "place, pre-eminence and precedence" next to the Queen "'on all occasions and in all meetings", unless otherwise provided by Act of Parliament.

In 1957, after being granted the "style and dignity of a Prince of the United Kingdom", the Duke became known as "the Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh".

In 1968, when the Duke turned 47, he was appointed to the Order of Merit, an honour given to individuals of great achievement in the fields of the arts, learning, literature and science.

The Duke is a former Chancellor of Cambridge, Edinburgh, Wales and Salford universities, and is a life Governor of King's College in the University of London.

In 2011, the Queen made her husband Lord High Admiral, the titular head of the Royal Navy, bestowing it as a gift to mark his 90th birthday. Philip served with the Mediterranean and Pacific fleets during the Second World War and sacrificed his naval career to support the Queen full time when she became monarch.

The Duke is also Grand Master and First and Principal Knight of the Order of the British Empire, which was founded by King George V to recognise public service throughout the Empire and Commonwealth.

One title that he does not hold, however, is that of Prince Consort, which was given to Queen Victoria's husband Prince Albert,

The Duke is now the longest serving consort in British history, but he rejected the offer of becoming Prince Consort in the early years of the Queen's reign.

He turned down the chance to use the title - according to correspondence by the then Prime Minister Sir Winston Churchill in 1954.

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