Belfast Telegraph

Home News UK

Residents evacuated due to landslide allowed home

Roughly 1,300 tons of sand and rock slipped from the site in Mansfield during heavy flooding.

A warning sign along Berry Hill Road that backs on to the edge of the quarry wall which forced the evacuation of residents of Bank End Close, Mansfield. PA Photo. Picture date: Friday November 8, 2019. Parts of England endured a month’s worth of rain in 24 hours, with scores of people rescued or forced to evacuate their homes, others stranded overnight in a shopping centre, and travel plans thrown into chaos. See PA story WEATHER Rain. (Simon Cooper/PA)
A warning sign along Berry Hill Road that backs on to the edge of the quarry wall which forced the evacuation of residents of Bank End Close, Mansfield. PA Photo. Picture date: Friday November 8, 2019. Parts of England endured a month’s worth of rain in 24 hours, with scores of people rescued or forced to evacuate their homes, others stranded overnight in a shopping centre, and travel plans thrown into chaos. See PA story WEATHER Rain. (Simon Cooper/PA)

By Mike Bedigan, PA

Residents of 19 households that were evacuated following a mudslide in early November have been allowed to return to their homes.

The slip, which caused 1,300 tons of sand and rock to fall from the former Berry Hill Quarry in Mansfield, occurred during the devastating flooding which hit multiple parts of the Nottinghamshire region.

Some 60 people were forced to live with friends and relatives, or in temporary accommodation organised by the council for over two weeks as work to stabilise the cliff face continued.

bpanews_29ea872a-9b45-4182-93e7-d236b6b1d13d_embedded248182028
A mudslide forced the evacuation of some 60 residents along Bank End Close, Mansfield in early November (Simon Cooper/PA)

At midday on Friday residents were permitted to re-enter their houses and were welcomed with care-packages from the local One Stop convenience store.

They were informed of the decision on Wednesday and given information about the ongoing plans and future safety measures.

Mike Robinson, strategic director of Mansfield District Council, said: “The residents were understandably concerned about the future but they were also extremely grateful for all the help and support they have been receiving from the council’s emergency response team since this incident.”

bpanews_29ea872a-9b45-4182-93e7-d236b6b1d13d_embedded248182110
The incident occurred during the heavy flooding which caused severe disruption in parts of Nottinghamshire (Simon Cooper/PA)

He added that many officers had gone “beyond the call of duty” to help the evacuees.

One officer fed a rabbit called Fluff, who could not be moved out immediately, for a week, while others had bravely rescued washing left on washing lines and took it home to launder before returning it to their owners.

The council has asked that locals be as co-operative as possible while work continues, but it is hoped that a design for stabilisation work will be ready before Christmas.

bpanews_29ea872a-9b45-4182-93e7-d236b6b1d13d_embedded248182025
Residents have now been allowed back home after spending over two weeks in temporary accommodation. (Simon Cooper/PA)

Mr Robinson added: “The land slip was an unforeseen event that was caused by extreme climatic conditions.

“Our main aim now is to stabilise the cliff to safeguard people’s properties and mitigate against any future risk of land slips.”

Data from the Met Office up to November 17 shows that Nottinghamshire has seen the most rain of all UK counties compared with the average, having seen 189% of its monthly average already.

PA

Popular

From Belfast Telegraph