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People taking part in the English Defence League march in Newcastle

People taking part in the English Defence League march in Newcastle

PA

Counter protestors shout at the English Defence League march in Newcastle

Counter protestors shout at the English Defence League march in Newcastle

PA

People taking part in the English Defence League march in Newcastle

Tensions across the UK following the murder of soldier Lee Rigby continued to lead to more arrests as police vowed to take a zero tolerance approach to religious or racially-aggravated attacks.

In Kent, an 85-year-old woman has been charged with a public order offence after being arrested on Friday following an incident in Canterbury Street, Gillingham, Kent.

Police across the country have made arrests on suspicion of hate crimes and comments posted on social networking sites amid reports of a rise in attacks against Muslims.

Faith Matters said that before Wednesday's brutal killing four to eight cases a day were reported to its helpline. But the anti-extremist group said about 150 incidents had been reported in the last few days, including attacks on mosques.

One of those charged with attacking a mosque is Andrew Grindlay, 45, from Rochester, who is accused of religiously aggravated criminal damage and burglary in Gillingham.

Elsewhere in Kent, police are investigating after another mosque in Folkestone had a rock thrown at its front door while worshippers were inside. No damage was caused but just after the attack, it was reported four young girls walked past and made racist comments, a Kent Police said.

Protests have also been held on the streets, including in Bristol, Portsmouth and, most significantly, in Newcastle where up to 2,000 English Defence League (EDL) supporters gathered on Saturday.

Kent Police assistant chief constable Gary Beautridge said: "We have made it clear what our approach will be to any reports of crime or disorder following the murder in Woolwich. We will be continuing that approach and will act swiftly to bring anyone into custody that is suspected of committing any offences.

"Kent Police has not received any intelligence to suggest any direct threat to anyone living in the county, but additional resources will continue to patrol to provide a presence in potentially vulnerable communities.

"Community liaison officers as well as neighbourhood teams have been in regular contact with community groups to keep them updated on any policing issues and to provide reassurance. We have good working relationships with a number of community groups all over the county and we are working with these, and are attending community events and places of worship regularly."