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What could Harry and Meghan’s Netflix shows be about?

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex stepped down as working royals at the end of March.

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The Duke and Duchess of Sussex (Yui Mok/PA)

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex (Yui Mok/PA)

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex (Yui Mok/PA)

The announcement that the Duke and Duchess of Sussex have signed a major deal with streaming giant Netflix has sparked questions on how the couple could be coming to our screens.

The pair will be producing a range of “content that informs but also gives hope” for Netflix, from documentaries and scripted series to features and children’s programming, the streaming service has said.

Netflix has also said there are several projects already in development including an innovative nature docu-series and an animated series that celebrates inspiring women.

Harry and Meghan, who stepped down as working royals at the end of March, have been outspoken on a number of issues, many of which could form the basis of a future show.

Here the PA news agency looks at possible subjects which could feature in the output from the collaboration.

– Wildlife conservation

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The Duke of Sussex at the Chobe National Park, Botswana (Dominic Lipinski/PA)

The Duke of Sussex at the Chobe National Park, Botswana (Dominic Lipinski/PA)

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The Duke of Sussex at the Chobe National Park, Botswana (Dominic Lipinski/PA)

The Duke of Sussex is the patron of two conservation charities, Rhino Conservation Botswana and African Parks.

He has previously said conservation is “fundamental to our survival”, adding his role had given him an opportunity to “meet, listen and learn from those who live in some of the world’s harshest conditions and understand what it is they so desperately need to thrive”.

The duchess has already narrated a Disney film about a family of elephants and their journey across Africa that was available to stream in April.

Meghan also renewed her sponsorship of a dog kennel at the animal charity Mayhew in the name of son Archie – and praised the organisation’s response to Covid-19 as its patron.

– Women’s empowerment

The Duchess of Sussex has made women’s empowerment and equality a key part of her campaigning work.

Meghan is a patron of the charity Smart Works, which provides training and interview clothes to women seeking employment.

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Meghan launched a capsule collection with the charity last year (Dominic Lipinski/PA)

Meghan launched a capsule collection with the charity last year (Dominic Lipinski/PA)

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Meghan launched a capsule collection with the charity last year (Dominic Lipinski/PA)

Last autumn she launched a high street clothing range with accessories in support of the organisation’s work.

She is also a supporter of the Hubb Community Kitchen, a group of women in North Kensington supporting those affected by the Grenfell Tower tragedy.

The duchess has also praised her husband as a “masculine feminist” in a discussion with US rights activist Gloria Steinem.

– Civil rights

Both Harry and Meghan have spoken out strongly on civil rights, particularly on combating racism in society, and are vocal supporters of the Black Lives Matter movement.

Meghan, the first mixed-race person to marry a senior royal, has she expressed her “absolute devastation” at racial divisions and the death of George Floyd in the US.

In June, she told girls graduating at her old high school: “I’m so sorry you have to grow up in a world where this is still present.”

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The death of George Floyd in police custody sparked anti-racism protests worldwide (Jonathan Brady/PA)

The death of George Floyd in police custody sparked anti-racism protests worldwide (Jonathan Brady/PA)

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The death of George Floyd in police custody sparked anti-racism protests worldwide (Jonathan Brady/PA)

Harry has repeatedly outlined his personal commitment to tackling institutional racism, including in a surprise message to recipients of this year’s Diana Award.

He said: “Institutional racism has no place in our societies, yet it is still endemic.

“Unconscious bias must be acknowledged without blame, to create a better world for all of you.”

Ahead of the US presidential election in November, Meghan has also stressed the need for women to vote and expressed concerns over voter suppression.

“If you aren’t going out there and voting, then you’re complicit. If you are complacent, you’re complicit,” she said last month.

– Children’s health

Improving children’s health worldwide has been a key part of Harry’s charitable work for several years.

The duke’s most prominent charity is Sentebale, the organisation he co-founded with Lesotho’s Prince Seeiso in 2006 to help the most vulnerable children and young people in southern Africa.

Over the last decade, Sentebale has scaled up its work in the southern African country of Lesotho and expanded into nearby Botswana, addressing the mental health and wellbeing of 10 to 19-year-olds who are struggling to come to terms with living with HIV.

Harry is also a patron of WellChild, a UK charity supporting families with seriously ill children, and has remained in contact with the charity despite stepping down as a senior royal and moving to the US.

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The Duke of Sussex is a patron of the WellChild charity (Toby Melville/PA)

The Duke of Sussex is a patron of the WellChild charity (Toby Melville/PA)

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The Duke of Sussex is a patron of the WellChild charity (Toby Melville/PA)

– Sport and the military

Harry also has several sporting interests, and is notably the founder of the Invictus Games.

The competition brings together current and former wounded, injured or sick servicemen and women from more than 20 countries.

Harry was previously interviewed for the Netflix film Rising Phoenix, a documentary about the Paralympics.

He has also supported the military charity Walking With The Wounded, and is a patron of the Rugby Football Union and The London Marathon Charitable Trust.

PA