Belfast Telegraph

Home News UK

Which votes has Boris Johnson lost since becoming Prime Minister?

Here’s a snapshot of the seven parliamentary defeats he has suffered since taking office.

Brexit (UK Parliament/Jessica Taylor)
Brexit (UK Parliament/Jessica Taylor)

By Harriet Line, PA Deputy Political Editor

Boris Johnson has failed to win seven key Commons votes since he became Prime Minister in July.

Here’s a snapshot of the defeats he has suffered since taking office.

– 1. European Union (Withdrawal): Sir Oliver Letwin’s motion submitted under Standing Order No. 24

On September 3, Mr Johnson failed to stop the then Tory MP Sir Oliver Letwin securing time for the Commons to discuss legislation designed to extend the Brexit process beyond October 31 unless a deal is approved by Parliament or it agrees to a no-deal exit by October 19.

Sir Oliver’s bid to take over the Commons timetable the following day was approved by 328 votes to 301, and marked the Prime Minister’s first defeat.

bpanews_4805f19b-cc16-43a7-8ad9-6153c019e26e_embedded245165373
Former Conservative Cabinet minister Sir Oliver Letwin (Jeff Overs/BBC)

– 2. European Union (Withdrawal)(No. 6) Bill: Second Reading

Following Sir Oliver’s win against the Government, on September 4 MPs approved legislation designed to delay Brexit if a deal has not yet been approved.

The Bill passed at second reading by 329 votes to 300, majority 29, despite opposition from the Conservatives.

– 3. European Union (Withdrawal)(No. 6) Bill: Third Reading

The so-called Benn Act cleared its final Commons hurdle on September 4 by 327 votes to 299.

It then went to the House of Lords where it also passed all stages, and received Royal Assent the following week.

– 4. That there shall be an early parliamentary general election

Mr Johnson lost his first bid for a general election as he failed to secure the support of two-thirds of MPs, with the Commons voting 298 to 56, 136 short of the number needed.

Although the vote marked his first majority, it was not enough to win the vote.

– 5. Standing Order No. 24 motion: Prorogation and disclosure of communication

The Government was told to publish communications connected to prorogation and no-deal Brexit planning after MPs supported an emergency Commons motion.

Former attorney general Dominic Grieve’s demand for all written and electronic contact about the temporary suspension of Parliament and Operation Yellowhammer documents since July 23 to be released was approved by 311 votes to 302, a majority of nine.

– 6. That there shall be an early parliamentary general election (No. 2 motion)

The Prime Minister lost his second attempt to hold an early general election, securing just 293 votes to 46, again falling far short of the support of two-thirds of MPs.

bpanews_4805f19b-cc16-43a7-8ad9-6153c019e26e_embedded245604343
Result of House of Commons vote on adjourning for the Conservative Party conference (PA Graphics)

– 7. Motion on conference adjournment

Mr Johnson’s bid for a parliamentary recess over the Conservative Party’s annual conference was rejected by 306 votes to 289.

The PM tabled the motion after his prorogation of Parliament was ruled unlawful.

– Supreme Court judgment

Not a parliamentary defeat, but a very significant loss for the Government nonetheless.

A panel of 11 justices at the Supreme Court in London ruled unanimously on Tuesday that the Prime Minister’s advice to the Queen to prorogue Parliament until October 14 was unlawful because it had the effect of frustrating Parliament.

The court also held that the prorogation itself was “void and of no effect” and therefore Parliament had not been suspended.

PA

Popular

From Belfast Telegraph