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Anders Breivik uses court statement to boast of Norway massacre

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Accused Norwegian Anders Behring Breivik looks at papers at the courtroom, in Oslo, Norway, Tuesday April 17, 2012. The anti-Muslim fanatic who admitted to killing 77 people in a bomb-and-shooting massacre took to the stand in his terror trial today

Accused Norwegian Anders Behring Breivik looks at papers at the courtroom, in Oslo, Norway, Tuesday April 17, 2012. The anti-Muslim fanatic who admitted to killing 77 people in a bomb-and-shooting massacre took to the stand in his terror trial today

Frank Augstein

Anders Behring Breivik gives a salute as he enters the courtroom in Oslo (AP)

Anders Behring Breivik gives a salute as he enters the courtroom in Oslo (AP)

Anders Breivik arrives for his trial in Oslo, Norway (AP)

Anders Breivik arrives for his trial in Oslo, Norway (AP)

A police van holding Anders Breivik leaves prison in Norway (AP)

A police van holding Anders Breivik leaves prison in Norway (AP)

Anders Breivik

Anders Breivik

Medics and emergency workers escort an injured person from a camp site on the island of Utoya (AP)

Medics and emergency workers escort an injured person from a camp site on the island of Utoya (AP)

Smoke rises from central Oslo after an explosion ripped through government buildings (AP/Scanpix)

Smoke rises from central Oslo after an explosion ripped through government buildings (AP/Scanpix)

Smoke rises from central Oslo after an explosion ripped through government buildings (AP/Scanpix)

Smoke rises from central Oslo after an explosion ripped through government buildings (AP/Scanpix)

A victim is treated outside government buildings in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2010, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents.(AP Photo/Fartein Rudjord)

A victim is treated outside government buildings in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2010, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents.(AP Photo/Fartein Rudjord)

Fartein Rudjord

Medics and emergency workers escort youths from a camp site on the island of Utoya, Norway Saturday July 23, 2011.  A Norwegian dressed as a police officer gunned down at least 84 people at an island retreat, police said Saturday. Investigators are still searching the surrounding waters, where people fled the attack, which followed an explosion in nearby Oslo that killed seven.    (AP Photo/Morten Edvardsen/Scanpix

Medics and emergency workers escort youths from a camp site on the island of Utoya, Norway Saturday July 23, 2011. A Norwegian dressed as a police officer gunned down at least 84 people at an island retreat, police said Saturday. Investigators are still searching the surrounding waters, where people fled the attack, which followed an explosion in nearby Oslo that killed seven. (AP Photo/Morten Edvardsen/Scanpix

SCANPIX NORWAY

An aerial view of Utoya Island, Norway taken Thursday, July 21, 2011

An aerial view of Utoya Island, Norway taken Thursday, July 21, 2011

Lasse Tur

An injured woman is helped by a passerby, in a doorway in Oslo, Norway, Friday July 22, 2011, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents and debris.  The Prime Minister is not hurt

An injured woman is helped by a passerby, in a doorway in Oslo, Norway, Friday July 22, 2011, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents and debris. The Prime Minister is not hurt

Morten Holm

Two women are seen leaving as rescue workers arrive to help the injured following an explosion in Oslo, Norway Friday July 22, 2011

Two women are seen leaving as rescue workers arrive to help the injured following an explosion in Oslo, Norway Friday July 22, 2011

Thomas Winje Aijord

Medics and emergency workers escort an injured person from a camp site on the island of Utoya, Norway Saturday July 23, 2011.  A Norwegian dressed as a police officer gunned down at least 84 people at an island retreat, police said Saturday. Investigators are still searching the surrounding waters, where people fled the attack, which followed an explosion in nearby Oslo that killed seven

Medics and emergency workers escort an injured person from a camp site on the island of Utoya, Norway Saturday July 23, 2011. A Norwegian dressed as a police officer gunned down at least 84 people at an island retreat, police said Saturday. Investigators are still searching the surrounding waters, where people fled the attack, which followed an explosion in nearby Oslo that killed seven

A tracked high speed mist fan is used to drag a damaged vehicle away from a building in central Oslo, Friday July 22, 2011, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents

A tracked high speed mist fan is used to drag a damaged vehicle away from a building in central Oslo, Friday July 22, 2011, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents

Roald, Berit

The wreckage of a car lies outside a building in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2010, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents and debris. A loud explosion shattered windows Friday at the government headquarters in Oslo which includes the prime minister's office, injuring several people.  Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg is safe, government spokeswoman Camilla Ryste told The Associated Press

The wreckage of a car lies outside a building in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2010, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents and debris. A loud explosion shattered windows Friday at the government headquarters in Oslo which includes the prime minister's office, injuring several people. Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg is safe, government spokeswoman Camilla Ryste told The Associated Press

Thomas Winje

A victim is treated outside government buildings in the center of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2011, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents. (AP Photo/Fartein Rudjord)

A victim is treated outside government buildings in the center of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2011, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents. (AP Photo/Fartein Rudjord)

Fartein Rudjord

In this image taken from TV smoke and flames billow from the shattered window of a building after an explosion in Oslo, Norway, Friday July 22, 2011.  A loud explosion shattered windows Friday in several buildings including the government headquarters in Oslo which includes the prime minister's office, injuring several people.  Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg is safe, government spokeswoman Camilla Ryste told The Associated Press

In this image taken from TV smoke and flames billow from the shattered window of a building after an explosion in Oslo, Norway, Friday July 22, 2011. A loud explosion shattered windows Friday in several buildings including the government headquarters in Oslo which includes the prime minister's office, injuring several people. Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg is safe, government spokeswoman Camilla Ryste told The Associated Press

The wreckagew of a car lies outside a building in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2010, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents.(AP Photo/Roald Berit, Scanpix, Norway)

The wreckagew of a car lies outside a building in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2010, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents.(AP Photo/Roald Berit, Scanpix, Norway)

Roald Berit

An officer responds in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2010, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents and debris

An officer responds in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2010, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents and debris

Thomas Winje Oijord

The scene after an explosion in Oslo, Norway, Friday July 22, 2011

The scene after an explosion in Oslo, Norway, Friday July 22, 2011

Holm Morten

The wreckage of a car lies outside government buildings in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2011, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering wiondows and covering the street with documents

The wreckage of a car lies outside government buildings in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2011, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering wiondows and covering the street with documents

Fartein Rudjord

Devastation caused after a powerful blast tore open several buildings (Holm Morten)

Devastation caused after a powerful blast tore open several buildings (Holm Morten)

An aerial view of Utoya Island, where a Labour Party youth camp was attacked by a gunman (AP)

An aerial view of Utoya Island, where a Labour Party youth camp was attacked by a gunman (AP)

A woman walks through debris in a street following an explosion in Oslo, Norway Friday July 22, 2011. A powerful blast tore open several Oslo buildings including the prime minister's office on Friday

A woman walks through debris in a street following an explosion in Oslo, Norway Friday July 22, 2011. A powerful blast tore open several Oslo buildings including the prime minister's office on Friday

Thomas Winje Aijord

Victims receive treatment outside government buildings in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2010, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office

Victims receive treatment outside government buildings in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2010, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office

Fartein Rudjord

The scene after an explosion in Oslo, Norway, Friday July 22, 2011

The scene after an explosion in Oslo, Norway, Friday July 22, 2011

Holm Morten

Smoke rises from the central area of Oslo Friday, July 22, 2011 after an explosion. Terrorism ravaged long-peaceful Norway on Friday when a bomb ripped open buildings including the prime minister's office and a man dressed as a police officer opened fire at a nearby island youth camp. (AP Photo/Scanpix, Jon Bredo Overaas)

Smoke rises from the central area of Oslo Friday, July 22, 2011 after an explosion. Terrorism ravaged long-peaceful Norway on Friday when a bomb ripped open buildings including the prime minister's office and a man dressed as a police officer opened fire at a nearby island youth camp. (AP Photo/Scanpix, Jon Bredo Overaas)

Jon Bredo ÿveraas

Wounded people are treated in the street in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2010, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents and debris

Wounded people are treated in the street in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2010, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents and debris

Berit Roald

Accused Norwegian Anders Behring Breivik looks at papers at the courtroom, in Oslo, Norway, Tuesday April 17, 2012. The anti-Muslim fanatic who admitted to killing 77 people in a bomb-and-shooting massacre took to the stand in his terror trial today

Anders Breivik defended his massacre of 77 people today and boasted the bomb-and-shooting rampage was the most "spectacular" attack by a nationalist militant since the Second World War.

Reading a prepared statement in court, the anti-Muslim extremist hit out at Norwegian and European governments for embracing immigration and multiculturalism.

"The attacks on July 22 were a preventive strike. I acted in self-defense on behalf of my people, my city, my country," Breivik said in his statement. "I therefore demand to be found innocent of the present charges."

He claimed to be speaking as a commander of a Norwegian and European "anti-communist" resistance movement and an anti-Islam militant group he called the Knights Templar.No evidence has been found of its existence.

Maintaining he acted out of "goodness not evil" to prevent a wider civil war, Breivik insisted, "I would have done it again."

The statement came after a lay judge was dismissed for his comments online the day following the July 22 attack that Breivik deserves the death penalty. Lawyers on all sides had requested that Thomas Indreboe be taken off the trial.

Breivik is being tried by a panel of two professional judges and three lay judges, local politicians who are appointed for four-year terms and participate on an equal basis as the judges in deciding guilt and sentencing. The system is designed to let ordinary people have a role in the Norwegian justice system, though the lead judge still runs the trial.

Indreboe was replaced by backup lay judge Elisabeth Wisloeff.

As at the start of the trial on Monday, Breivik entered the court smirking before flashing a clenched-fist salute.

Breivik has five days to explain why he set off a bomb in Oslo's government district, killing eight, and then gunned down 69 at a Labor Party youth camp outside the Norwegian capital. He denies criminal guilt saying he was acting in self-defense.

Survivors of the massacre have worried he will use his testimony as a platform to promote his extremist views. The key issue for the court to decide is whether Breivik is psychotic.

Breivik claimed Monday he acted in self-defense to protect Norway from Muslims by attacking the left-leaning political party he blamed for the country's liberal immigration policies.

Breivik rejected the authority of the court, calling it a vehicle of the "multiculturalist" political parties in power in Norway. He confessed to the "acts" but pleaded not guilty.

Even his lawyers concede his defense is unlikely to succeed, and said the main thing for them was to convince the court that Breivik is not insane.

One psychiatric examination found him legally insane while another reached the opposite conclusion. It is up to the panel to decide whether to send him to prison or compulsory psychiatric care.

Breivik could face a maximum 21-year prison sentence or an alternate custody arrangement that would keep him locked up as long as he is considered a menace to society.

Judge Wenche Elisabeth Arntzen repeatedly interrupted Breivik asking him to keep his statement short.

"It is critically important that I can explain the reason and the motive" for the massacre, Breivik said.

He said he acted in self-defence to protect Norway from Muslims by attacking the left-leaning political party he blamed for the country's liberal immigration policies.

According to Breivik, Western Europe was gradually taken over by "Marxists and multiculturalists" after the Second World War, because it did not have "anti-communist" leaders like US senator Joseph McCarthy. The senator dominated the early 1950s by his sensational but unproved charges of Communist subversion in high government circles.

His probes gave rise to the term McCarthyism, which describes the persecution of innocent persons on the charge of being Communists.

"But even McCarthy was too moderate," Breivik said.

Belfast Telegraph