| 11.1°C Belfast

Emergency meeting after North Korea 'sinks S Korea warship'

Close

The South Korean naval ship Cheonan sank in the Yellow Sea (AP)

The South Korean naval ship Cheonan sank in the Yellow Sea (AP)

A South Korean activist holds a defaced portrait of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il (AP)

A South Korean activist holds a defaced portrait of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il (AP)

Photographers capture torpedo parts salvaged from the sunken South Korean warship (AP)

Photographers capture torpedo parts salvaged from the sunken South Korean warship (AP)

/

The South Korean naval ship Cheonan sank in the Yellow Sea (AP)

South Korea's president has convened an emergency national security meeting, a day after an official report concluded that North Korea was responsible for the deadly sinking of a naval patrol ship.

North Korea, for its part, has talked of war for a second straight day, and tensions on the Korean peninsula were expected to dominate the agenda for US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton as she visits the region.

South Korea has accused North Korea of sinking the patrol ship Cheonan with a torpedo in late March in what was the deadliest attack on the South since the Korean War ended in 1953.

President Lee Myung-bak convened a meeting of his National Security Council, which consists of the prime minister, the foreign and defence ministers, the minister in charge of unification with North Korea and the chief of the National Intelligence Service.

Lee vowed to take "resolute countermeasures" against the North over the sinking and is expected to give an address to the nation in coming days.

North Korea, which has denied any role in the sinking, said it "will regard the present situation as the phase of war and decisively handle all matters arising in inter-Korean relations to cope with it".

The remarks were included in a statement by the Committee for the Peaceful Reunification of Korea, which is in charge of inter-Korean affairs and carried on the Korean Central News Agency, and followed one by the country's military that any retaliation over the sinking would mean "all-out war".

Daily Headlines & Evening Telegraph Newsletter

Receive today's headlines directly to your inbox every morning and evening, with our free daily newsletter.

This field is required

Mrs Clinton is scheduled to begin a three-nation tour of the region with a visit to Japan on Friday, before heading to China and South Korea.

Japan criticised the North over the sinking, but China, Pyongyang's key ally, refrained from doing so, instead calling on all parties to "stay calm and exercise restraint."

Just hours before Mrs Clinton departed, the White House called the ship sinking an "act of aggression" and said it was "a challenge to international peace and security and a violation of the Armistice Agreement" that ended the Korean War.


Top Videos



Privacy