| 2.8°C Belfast

Leaked memo reveals 'discovery of Higgs boson God particle' at Large Hadron Collider

Close

The Large Hadron Collider

The Large Hadron Collider

<b>Smashing particle idea</b><br/>
The Independent reports that London Underground is in talks with European Organisation for Nuclear Research (Cern) about the possibility of using he 23km tunnel of the Circle Line to house a new type of particle accelerator similar to the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva. Particle physicists believe the existing tunnel can be adapted to take a small-scale "atom smasher" alongside the passenger line at a fraction of the cost of building a new tunnel elsewhere in Europe. They are understood to have approached London Underground with a view to announcing a feasibility study later this year.

<b>Smashing particle idea</b><br/> The Independent reports that London Underground is in talks with European Organisation for Nuclear Research (Cern) about the possibility of using he 23km tunnel of the Circle Line to house a new type of particle accelerator similar to the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva. Particle physicists believe the existing tunnel can be adapted to take a small-scale "atom smasher" alongside the passenger line at a fraction of the cost of building a new tunnel elsewhere in Europe. They are understood to have approached London Underground with a view to announcing a feasibility study later this year.

European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) scientists control computer screens showing traces on Atlas experiment of the first protons injected in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) during its switch on operation at the Cern's press center on Wednesday, Sept. 10, 2008 near Geneva, Switzerland. Scientists fired a first beam of protons around a 27-kilometer (17mile) tunnel housing the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). They hope to recreate conditions just after the so-called Big Bang. The international group of scientists plan to smash particles together to create, on a small-scale, re-enactments of the Big Bang. (AP Photo/Fabrice Coffrini, Pool)

European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) scientists control computer screens showing traces on Atlas experiment of the first protons injected in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) during its switch on operation at the Cern's press center on Wednesday, Sept. 10, 2008 near Geneva, Switzerland. Scientists fired a first beam of protons around a 27-kilometer (17mile) tunnel housing the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). They hope to recreate conditions just after the so-called Big Bang. The international group of scientists plan to smash particles together to create, on a small-scale, re-enactments of the Big Bang. (AP Photo/Fabrice Coffrini, Pool)

Fabrice Coffrini

The Cern computer system displays images generated of the first collisions to take place in the Large Hadron Collider

The Cern computer system displays images generated of the first collisions to take place in the Large Hadron Collider

**ADVANCE FOR SUNDAY, JUNE 29--FILE**  In this March 22, 2007 file photo, the magnet core of the world's largest superconducting solenoid magnet (CMS, Compact Muon Solenoid) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN)'s Large Hadron Collider (LHC) particle accelerator, which is scheduled to switch on in November 2007, in Geneva, Switzerland.  Some 2000 scientists from 155 institutes in 36 countries are working together to build the CMS particle detector. (AP Photo/Keystone, Martial Trezzini, file)

**ADVANCE FOR SUNDAY, JUNE 29--FILE** In this March 22, 2007 file photo, the magnet core of the world's largest superconducting solenoid magnet (CMS, Compact Muon Solenoid) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN)'s Large Hadron Collider (LHC) particle accelerator, which is scheduled to switch on in November 2007, in Geneva, Switzerland. Some 2000 scientists from 155 institutes in 36 countries are working together to build the CMS particle detector. (AP Photo/Keystone, Martial Trezzini, file)

MARTIAL TREZZINI

A European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) scientist controls a computer screen showing traces on Atlas experiment of the first protons injected in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) during its switch on operation at the Cern's press center on Wednesday, Sept. 10, 2008 near Geneva, Switzerland. Scientists fired a first beam of protons around a 27-kilometer (17 mile) tunnel housing the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). They hope to recreate conditions just after the so-called Big Bang. The international group of scientists plan to smash particles together to create, on a small-scale, re-enactments of the Big Bang. (AP Photo/Fabrice Coffrini, Pool)

A European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) scientist controls a computer screen showing traces on Atlas experiment of the first protons injected in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) during its switch on operation at the Cern's press center on Wednesday, Sept. 10, 2008 near Geneva, Switzerland. Scientists fired a first beam of protons around a 27-kilometer (17 mile) tunnel housing the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). They hope to recreate conditions just after the so-called Big Bang. The international group of scientists plan to smash particles together to create, on a small-scale, re-enactments of the Big Bang. (AP Photo/Fabrice Coffrini, Pool)

Fabrice Coffrini

View of the LHC (large hadron collider) in its tunnel at CERN near Geneva

View of the LHC (large hadron collider) in its tunnel at CERN near Geneva

MARTIAL TREZZINI

Employees inspect the ATLAS detector construction (a Toroidal LHC Apparatus) at the the CERN (Centre Europeen de Recherche Nucleaire) near Geneva, Switzerland, on Thursday, May 31, 2007. The detector will be placed around the large hadron collider (LHC), CERN's highest energy particle accelerator. ATLAS is a general-purpose detector designed to measure the broadest possible range of particles and physical processes that could result from the collision of the proton beams within the LHC. A pilot run of the LHC is scheduled for summer 2007. (KEYSTONE/Martial Trezzini)

Employees inspect the ATLAS detector construction (a Toroidal LHC Apparatus) at the the CERN (Centre Europeen de Recherche Nucleaire) near Geneva, Switzerland, on Thursday, May 31, 2007. The detector will be placed around the large hadron collider (LHC), CERN's highest energy particle accelerator. ATLAS is a general-purpose detector designed to measure the broadest possible range of particles and physical processes that could result from the collision of the proton beams within the LHC. A pilot run of the LHC is scheduled for summer 2007. (KEYSTONE/Martial Trezzini)

MARTIAL TREZZINI

Spectators look at the ATLAS detector construction (a Toroidal LHC Apparatus) at the CERN (Centre Europeen de Recherche Nucleaire) near Geneva, Switzerland, Thursday, May 31, 2007. The detector will be placed around the large hadron collider (LHC), CERN's highest energy particle accelerator. ATLAS is a general-purpose detector designed to measure the broadest possible range of particles and physical processes that could result from the collision of the proton beams within the LHC. A pilot run of the LHC is scheduled for summer 2007. (KEYSTONE/Martial Trezzini)

Spectators look at the ATLAS detector construction (a Toroidal LHC Apparatus) at the CERN (Centre Europeen de Recherche Nucleaire) near Geneva, Switzerland, Thursday, May 31, 2007. The detector will be placed around the large hadron collider (LHC), CERN's highest energy particle accelerator. ATLAS is a general-purpose detector designed to measure the broadest possible range of particles and physical processes that could result from the collision of the proton beams within the LHC. A pilot run of the LHC is scheduled for summer 2007. (KEYSTONE/Martial Trezzini)

MARTIAL TREZZINI

Spectators look at the ATLAS detector construction (a Toroidal LHC Apparatus) at the CERN (Centre Europeen de Recherche Nucleaire) near Geneva, Switzerland, Thursday, May 31, 2007. The detector will be placed around the large hadron collider (LHC), CERN's highest energy particle accelerator. ATLAS is a general-purpose detector designed to measure the broadest possible range of particles and physical processes that could result from the collision of the proton beams within the LHC. A pilot run of the LHC is scheduled for summer 2007. (KEYSTONE/Martial Trezzini)

Spectators look at the ATLAS detector construction (a Toroidal LHC Apparatus) at the CERN (Centre Europeen de Recherche Nucleaire) near Geneva, Switzerland, Thursday, May 31, 2007. The detector will be placed around the large hadron collider (LHC), CERN's highest energy particle accelerator. ATLAS is a general-purpose detector designed to measure the broadest possible range of particles and physical processes that could result from the collision of the proton beams within the LHC. A pilot run of the LHC is scheduled for summer 2007. (KEYSTONE/Martial Trezzini)

MARTIAL TREZZINI

View of the LHC (large hadron collider) in its tunnel at CERN (European particle physics laboratory) near Geneva, Switzerland, Thursday, May 31, 2007. The LHC is a 27-kilometre-long underground ring of superconducting magnets housed in this pipe-like structure or cryostat. The cryostat is cooled by liquid helium to keep it at an operating temperature just above absolute zero. It will accelerate two counter-rotating beam of protons to an energy of 7 tera electron volts (TeV) and then bring them to collide head on. Several detectors are being built around the LHC to detect the various particles produced by the collision. A pilot run of the LHC is scheduled for summer 2007. (KEYSTONE/Martial Trezzini)

View of the LHC (large hadron collider) in its tunnel at CERN (European particle physics laboratory) near Geneva, Switzerland, Thursday, May 31, 2007. The LHC is a 27-kilometre-long underground ring of superconducting magnets housed in this pipe-like structure or cryostat. The cryostat is cooled by liquid helium to keep it at an operating temperature just above absolute zero. It will accelerate two counter-rotating beam of protons to an energy of 7 tera electron volts (TeV) and then bring them to collide head on. Several detectors are being built around the LHC to detect the various particles produced by the collision. A pilot run of the LHC is scheduled for summer 2007. (KEYSTONE/Martial Trezzini)

MARTIAL TREZZINI

Spectators look at the ATLAS detector construction (a Toroidal LHC Apparatus) at the CERN (Centre Europeen de Recherche Nucleaire) near Geneva, Switzerland, Thursday, May 31, 2007. The detector will be placed around the large hadron collider (LHC), CERN's highest energy particle accelerator. ATLAS is a general-purpose detector designed to measure the broadest possible range of particles and physical processes that could result from the collision of the proton beams within the LHC. A pilot run of the LHC is scheduled for summer 2007. (KEYSTONE/Martial Trezzini)

Spectators look at the ATLAS detector construction (a Toroidal LHC Apparatus) at the CERN (Centre Europeen de Recherche Nucleaire) near Geneva, Switzerland, Thursday, May 31, 2007. The detector will be placed around the large hadron collider (LHC), CERN's highest energy particle accelerator. ATLAS is a general-purpose detector designed to measure the broadest possible range of particles and physical processes that could result from the collision of the proton beams within the LHC. A pilot run of the LHC is scheduled for summer 2007. (KEYSTONE/Martial Trezzini)

MARTIAL TREZZINI

**FILE**This March 22, 2007 file photo, shows the magnet core of the world's largest superconducting solenoid magnet (CMS, Compact Muon Solenoid) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN)'s Large Hadron Collider (LHC) particle accelerator, which is scheduled to be switched on in November, in Geneva, Switzerland. Some 2,000 scientists from 155 institutes in 36 countries are working together to build the CMS particle detector. (AP Photo/Keystone, Martial Trezzini, file)

**FILE**This March 22, 2007 file photo, shows the magnet core of the world's largest superconducting solenoid magnet (CMS, Compact Muon Solenoid) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN)'s Large Hadron Collider (LHC) particle accelerator, which is scheduled to be switched on in November, in Geneva, Switzerland. Some 2,000 scientists from 155 institutes in 36 countries are working together to build the CMS particle detector. (AP Photo/Keystone, Martial Trezzini, file)

MARTIAL TREZZINI

/

The Large Hadron Collider

A rumoured encounter with the Higgs boson, also known as the "God particle", at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) near Geneva has led to hysteria among some scientists.

However experts have urged caution over a leaked internal memo, warning it could well be a false alarm.

Finding the Higgs is one of the main goals of the LHC, a 17-mile underground tunnel.

The Higgs was proposed in the 1960s to explain why matter has mass and is the missing piece of the standard model of particle physics. Speculation has now run wild on the internet after an anonymous note was posted on the blog of Columbia University mathematician Peter Woit.

The memo revealed that one of the LHC detectors had picked up a signal consistent with what Higgs is expected to produce.

The scientists noted that "the present result is the first definitive observation of physics beyond the standard model".

But Cern, the European organisation for nuclear research, stressed the note was only preliminary.

Spokesman James Gillies said it was "way, way too early" to confirm whether Higgs had been detected, and he told Wired magazine: "The vast majority of these notes get knocked down before they ever see the light of day."

Belfast Telegraph


Privacy