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Norway gunman Anders Breivik: Free me or execute me

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Anders Behring Breivik gestures on arrival at the courtroom, in Oslo, Norway, Wednesday April 18, 2012.

Anders Behring Breivik gestures on arrival at the courtroom, in Oslo, Norway, Wednesday April 18, 2012.

Aserud, Lise

Breivik, centre, said he had plans to capture and kill the former Norwegian Prime Minister (AP)

Breivik, centre, said he had plans to capture and kill the former Norwegian Prime Minister (AP)

Accused Norwegian Anders Behring Breivik looks at papers at the courtroom, in Oslo, Norway, Tuesday April 17, 2012. The anti-Muslim fanatic who admitted to killing 77 people in a bomb-and-shooting massacre took to the stand in his terror trial today

Accused Norwegian Anders Behring Breivik looks at papers at the courtroom, in Oslo, Norway, Tuesday April 17, 2012. The anti-Muslim fanatic who admitted to killing 77 people in a bomb-and-shooting massacre took to the stand in his terror trial today

Frank Augstein

Anders Breivik said he prepared for a firefight with police by playing video games (Scanpix Norway)

Anders Breivik said he prepared for a firefight with police by playing video games (Scanpix Norway)

Anders Breivik arrives for his trial in Oslo, Norway (AP)

Anders Breivik arrives for his trial in Oslo, Norway (AP)

A police van holding Anders Breivik leaves prison in Norway (AP)

A police van holding Anders Breivik leaves prison in Norway (AP)

Anders Breivik

Anders Breivik

Two women are seen leaving as rescue workers arrive to help the injured following an explosion in Oslo, Norway Friday July 22, 2011

Two women are seen leaving as rescue workers arrive to help the injured following an explosion in Oslo, Norway Friday July 22, 2011

Thomas Winje Aijord

Medics and emergency workers escort an injured person from a camp site on the island of Utoya (AP)

Medics and emergency workers escort an injured person from a camp site on the island of Utoya (AP)

Smoke rises from central Oslo after an explosion ripped through government buildings (AP/Scanpix)

Smoke rises from central Oslo after an explosion ripped through government buildings (AP/Scanpix)

A victim is treated outside government buildings in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2010, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents.(AP Photo/Fartein Rudjord)

A victim is treated outside government buildings in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2010, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents.(AP Photo/Fartein Rudjord)

Fartein Rudjord

Medics and emergency workers escort youths from a camp site on the island of Utoya, Norway Saturday July 23, 2011.  A Norwegian dressed as a police officer gunned down at least 84 people at an island retreat, police said Saturday. Investigators are still searching the surrounding waters, where people fled the attack, which followed an explosion in nearby Oslo that killed seven.    (AP Photo/Morten Edvardsen/Scanpix

Medics and emergency workers escort youths from a camp site on the island of Utoya, Norway Saturday July 23, 2011. A Norwegian dressed as a police officer gunned down at least 84 people at an island retreat, police said Saturday. Investigators are still searching the surrounding waters, where people fled the attack, which followed an explosion in nearby Oslo that killed seven. (AP Photo/Morten Edvardsen/Scanpix

SCANPIX NORWAY

An aerial view of Utoya Island, Norway taken Thursday, July 21, 2011

An aerial view of Utoya Island, Norway taken Thursday, July 21, 2011

Lasse Tur

An injured woman is helped by a passerby, in a doorway in Oslo, Norway, Friday July 22, 2011, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents and debris.  The Prime Minister is not hurt

An injured woman is helped by a passerby, in a doorway in Oslo, Norway, Friday July 22, 2011, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents and debris. The Prime Minister is not hurt

Morten Holm

Medics and emergency workers escort an injured person from a camp site on the island of Utoya, Norway Saturday July 23, 2011.  A Norwegian dressed as a police officer gunned down at least 84 people at an island retreat, police said Saturday. Investigators are still searching the surrounding waters, where people fled the attack, which followed an explosion in nearby Oslo that killed seven

Medics and emergency workers escort an injured person from a camp site on the island of Utoya, Norway Saturday July 23, 2011. A Norwegian dressed as a police officer gunned down at least 84 people at an island retreat, police said Saturday. Investigators are still searching the surrounding waters, where people fled the attack, which followed an explosion in nearby Oslo that killed seven

A tracked high speed mist fan is used to drag a damaged vehicle away from a building in central Oslo, Friday July 22, 2011, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents

A tracked high speed mist fan is used to drag a damaged vehicle away from a building in central Oslo, Friday July 22, 2011, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents

Roald, Berit

The wreckage of a car lies outside a building in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2010, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents and debris. A loud explosion shattered windows Friday at the government headquarters in Oslo which includes the prime minister's office, injuring several people.  Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg is safe, government spokeswoman Camilla Ryste told The Associated Press

The wreckage of a car lies outside a building in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2010, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents and debris. A loud explosion shattered windows Friday at the government headquarters in Oslo which includes the prime minister's office, injuring several people. Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg is safe, government spokeswoman Camilla Ryste told The Associated Press

Thomas Winje

A victim is treated outside government buildings in the center of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2011, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents. (AP Photo/Fartein Rudjord)

A victim is treated outside government buildings in the center of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2011, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents. (AP Photo/Fartein Rudjord)

Fartein Rudjord

In this image taken from TV smoke and flames billow from the shattered window of a building after an explosion in Oslo, Norway, Friday July 22, 2011.  A loud explosion shattered windows Friday in several buildings including the government headquarters in Oslo which includes the prime minister's office, injuring several people.  Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg is safe, government spokeswoman Camilla Ryste told The Associated Press

In this image taken from TV smoke and flames billow from the shattered window of a building after an explosion in Oslo, Norway, Friday July 22, 2011. A loud explosion shattered windows Friday in several buildings including the government headquarters in Oslo which includes the prime minister's office, injuring several people. Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg is safe, government spokeswoman Camilla Ryste told The Associated Press

The wreckagew of a car lies outside a building in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2010, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents.(AP Photo/Roald Berit, Scanpix, Norway)

The wreckagew of a car lies outside a building in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2010, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents.(AP Photo/Roald Berit, Scanpix, Norway)

Roald Berit

An officer responds in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2010, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents and debris

An officer responds in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2010, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents and debris

Thomas Winje Oijord

The scene after an explosion in Oslo, Norway, Friday July 22, 2011

The scene after an explosion in Oslo, Norway, Friday July 22, 2011

Holm Morten

The wreckage of a car lies outside government buildings in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2011, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering wiondows and covering the street with documents

The wreckage of a car lies outside government buildings in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2011, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering wiondows and covering the street with documents

Fartein Rudjord

Devastation caused after a powerful blast tore open several buildings (Holm Morten)

Devastation caused after a powerful blast tore open several buildings (Holm Morten)

An aerial view of Utoya Island, where a Labour Party youth camp was attacked by a gunman (AP)

An aerial view of Utoya Island, where a Labour Party youth camp was attacked by a gunman (AP)

A woman walks through debris in a street following an explosion in Oslo, Norway Friday July 22, 2011. A powerful blast tore open several Oslo buildings including the prime minister's office on Friday

A woman walks through debris in a street following an explosion in Oslo, Norway Friday July 22, 2011. A powerful blast tore open several Oslo buildings including the prime minister's office on Friday

Thomas Winje Aijord

Victims receive treatment outside government buildings in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2010, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office

Victims receive treatment outside government buildings in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2010, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office

Fartein Rudjord

The scene after an explosion in Oslo, Norway, Friday July 22, 2011

The scene after an explosion in Oslo, Norway, Friday July 22, 2011

Holm Morten

Smoke rises from the central area of Oslo Friday, July 22, 2011 after an explosion. Terrorism ravaged long-peaceful Norway on Friday when a bomb ripped open buildings including the prime minister's office and a man dressed as a police officer opened fire at a nearby island youth camp. (AP Photo/Scanpix, Jon Bredo Overaas)

Smoke rises from the central area of Oslo Friday, July 22, 2011 after an explosion. Terrorism ravaged long-peaceful Norway on Friday when a bomb ripped open buildings including the prime minister's office and a man dressed as a police officer opened fire at a nearby island youth camp. (AP Photo/Scanpix, Jon Bredo Overaas)

Jon Bredo ÿveraas

Wounded people are treated in the street in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2010, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents and debris

Wounded people are treated in the street in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2010, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents and debris

Berit Roald

Anders Behring Breivik gestures on arrival at the courtroom, in Oslo, Norway, Wednesday April 18, 2012.

Norway's self-confessed mass killer, Anders Behring Breivik, angrily dismissed the prospect of a lengthy jail term as “pathetic” yesterday and insisted that the death penalty or acquittal were the only “logical” legal responses to his slaughter of 77 people last year.

The 33-year-old right wing fanatic's outburst came after tough questioning from prosecutors on the third day of his trial for carrying out Norway's worst acts of violence since the Second World War. He killed eight in an Oslo bomb blast and shot dead 69 young people attending a Labour Party summer camp last July.

“If I had feared death, I would not have dared to carry out this operation,” Breivik boasted to the court in support of his death penalty plea. Observers said his angry and illogical remarks showed he was beginning to feel the strain of cross-examination. Norway abolished the death penalty in 1979.

His outburst followed questioning about his claims to belong to a militant anti-Islamic terrorist organisation, called the ‘Knights Templar’, which prosecutors do not believe exists.

Breivik told the court yesterday that prior to carrying out his 2011 massacre, he was “ordained” in London by the group. Pressed about its authenticity, Breivik snapped back at examining prosecutor Inga Bejer Engh, saying “it was not an organisation in the conventional sense” but a group made up of “independent cells”.

Breivik is said to have attended a meeting of the ‘Knights Templar’ in a cafe in London in the spring of 2002. He told the court one of the group's founding members was a Serb nationalist “war hero” who he met in Liberia in 2002.

His descriptions echoed the “manifesto” Breivik posted online shortly before he carried out his attacks. It included a theatrical photographic portrait of him dressed in a black tunic which was covered with sinister pseudo insignia including a death's head pierced by a medieval sword.

Relatives and friends of Breivik's victims sat behind a bulletproof screen as they witnessed the killer making his claims. “I think what we are watching is the revelation of some sort of fantasy or dream,” said Christian Bjelland, of the survivors’ support group.

factfile

Whether the ‘Knights Templar’ exist or are merely a figment of Breivik's imagination is likely to be one of the key factors in determining the trial’s outcome. If judges rule the group is a fantasy, it will support the conclusion of one psychiatric report which argues Breivik is a schizophrenic who should spend the rest of his life in care. However a second psychiatric report recently found Breivik to be sane. If judges accept these findings, he could face a maximum 21-year jail term.

Belfast Telegraph