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WikiLeaks: Bradley Manning sentenced to 35 years in prison for leaking classified information

FORT MEADE, MD - JULY 30: U.S. Army Private First Class Bradley Manning (R) is escorted by military police as arrives to hear the verdict in his military trial July 30, 2013
FORT MEADE, MD - JULY 30: U.S. Army Private First Class Bradley Manning (R) is escorted by military police as arrives to hear the verdict in his military trial July 30, 2013
Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, right, is escorted into a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., Monday, July 29, 2013, before the third day of deliberations in his court martial. Manning faces charges including aiding the enemy, espionage, computer fraud and theft for admittedly sending hundreds of thousands of classified documents and some battlefield video to the anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks while working as an intelligence analyst in Iraq. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, right, is escorted into a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., Monday, July 29, 2013, as military judge Col. Denise Lind begins her third day of deliberations in his court martial. Manning faces charges including aiding the enemy, espionage, computer fraud and theft for admittedly sending hundreds of thousands of classified documents and some battlefield video to the anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks while working as an intelligence analyst in Iraq. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, center, steps out of a security vehicle as he is escorted into a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., Monday, July 29, 2013, before the third day of deliberations in his court martial. Manning faces charges including aiding the enemy, espionage, computer fraud and theft for admittedly sending hundreds of thousands of classified documents and some battlefield video to the anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks while working as an intelligence analyst in Iraq. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
FORT MEADE, MD - JULY 30: Supporters of U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley E. Manning hold signs to show support during a demonstration outside the main gate of Ft. Meade July 30, 2013 in Maryland. Military Judge Col. Denise Lind, who is presiding in the case of United States vs. Pfc. Bradley E. Manning, has reached a verdict and she is scheduled to read the verdict at 1pm today. Manning could face a life sentence for charges of espionage, aiding the enemy and computer fraud, for passing classified documents to WikiLeaks. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
FORT MEADE, MD - JULY 30: Yoni Miller (R) of Social Movement Technologies, along with other supporters of U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley E. Manning, hold signs to show support during a demonstration outside the main gate of Ft. Meade July 30, 2013 in Maryland. Military Judge Col. Denise Lind, who is presiding in the case of United States vs. Pfc. Bradley E. Manning, has reached a verdict and she is scheduled to read the verdict at 1pm today. Manning could face a life sentence for charges of espionage, aiding the enemy and computer fraud, for passing classified documents to WikiLeaks. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
FORT MEADE, MD - JULY 30: Supporters of U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley E. Manning hold signs to show support during a demonstration outside the main gate of Ft. Meade July 30, 2013 in Maryland. Military Judge Col. Denise Lind, who is presiding in the case of United States vs. Pfc. Bradley E. Manning, has reached a verdict and she is scheduled to read the verdict at 1pm today. Manning could face a life sentence for charges of espionage, aiding the enemy and computer fraud, for passing classified documents to WikiLeaks. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
FORT MEADE, MD - JULY 30: U.S. Army Private First Class Bradley Manning (C) is escorted by military police as arrives to hear the verdict in his military trial July 30, 2013 at Fort George G. Meade, Maryland. Manning, who is charged with aiding the enemy and wrongfully causing intelligence to be published on the internet, is accused of sending hundreds of thousands of classified Iraq and Afghanistan war logs and more than 250,000 diplomatic cables to the website WikiLeaks while he was working as an intelligence analyst in Baghdad in 2009 and 2010. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
FORT MEADE, MD - JULY 30: U.S. Army Private First Class Bradley Manning (R) is escorted by military police as arrives to hear the verdict in his military trial July 30, 2013 at Fort George G. Meade, Maryland. Manning, who is charged with aiding the enemy and wrongfully causing intelligence to be published on the internet, is accused of sending hundreds of thousands of classified Iraq and Afghanistan war logs and more than 250,000 diplomatic cables to the website WikiLeaks while he was working as an intelligence analyst in Baghdad in 2009 and 2010. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
BERLIN, GERMANY - JULY 27: A participant whistles through his fingers as a sign behind shows support for U.S. soldier and whistleblower Bradley Manning at a protest march against the electonic surveillance tactics of the NSA on July 27, 2013 in Berlin, Germany. The NSA scandal has been especially contentious in Germany after media reports claimed the NSA had conducted wide scale gathering of electonic data, including e-mails, of German citizens. Activists are demonstrating against the NSA in cities across Germany today. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
BERLIN, GERMANY - JULY 27: A participant holds a sign in support of former NSA employee Edward Snowden prior to a protest march in support of Snowden, Bradley Manning and against the electonic surveillance tactics of the NSA on July 27, 2013 in Berlin, Germany. The NSA scandal has been especially contentious in Germany after media reports claimed the NSA had conducted wide scale gathering of electonic data, including e-mails, of German citizens. Activists are demonstrating against the NSA in cities across Germany today. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
BERLIN, GERMANY - JULY 27: Activists demonstrate in support of former NSA employee Edward Snowden and U.S. soldier Bradley Manning while protesting against the electonic surveillance tactics of the NSA on July 27, 2013 in Berlin, Germany. The NSA scandal has been especially contentious in Germany after media reports claimed the NSA had conducted wide scale gathering of electonic data, including e-mails, of German citizens. Activists are demonstrating against the NSA in cities across Germany today. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

US soldier Bradley Manning has been sentenced to 35 years in prison after being convicted of handing over secret government documents to the WikiLeaks website.

Manning was sentenced for giving the anti-secrecy group more than 700,000 US military and diplomatic documents and battlefield video documenting civilian deaths.

The military judge at Fort Meade, near Baltimore, convicted the soldier last month of 20 offences, including six violations of the Espionage Act.

He could have been sentenced to 90 years in prison.

The 25-year-old took the stand during his sentencing hearing earlier this month, apologising for the turmoil his actions had caused and for the damage they had inflicted on the interests of the United States.

Prosecutors had called Manning an anarchist computer hacker and attention-seeking traitor. The soldier's supporters have hailed him as a whistleblower.

Prosecutors also asked for at least 60 years behind bars. Manning's lawyer suggested no more than 25, because by then, some of the documents Manning leaked will be declassified.

Former CIA director David Petraeus handed two years’ probation and a $100K fine for leaking classified information 

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