Belfast Telegraph

Isis is using terror to eliminate multicultural countries like Germany – and the far-right is helping them

The intention of Isis' terror attacks is to provoke European states to ‘persecute’ Muslims within their frontiers in acts of reprisal for the mass killing of Western Europeans

Rescue workers gather with stretchers outside a tent in the area after a lorry truck ploughed through a Christmas market on December 19, 2016 in Berlin, Germany. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
Rescue workers gather with stretchers outside a tent in the area after a lorry truck ploughed through a Christmas market on December 19, 2016 in Berlin, Germany. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
A truck is towed away from the Christmas market at Breitscheidplatz square in Berlin, Germany, Tuesday Dec. 20, 2016. The truck ran into a crowded Christmas market in Berlin the evening before and killed several people. ( Bernd von Jutrczenka/dpa via AP)
Medics and firefighters work at the scene where a truck crashed into a christmas market at Gedächniskirche church in Berlin, on December 19, 2016 killing at least nine people and injuring at least 50 people. AFP/Getty Images
View of the truck that crashed into a christmas market at Gedächniskirche church in Berlin, on December 19, 2016 killing at least nine people and injuring at least 50 people. AFP/Getty Images
(L-R) Berlin's mayor Michael Mueller, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, German Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere and German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier lay down flowers at a makeshift memorial for the victims of an attack on December 20, 2016 in front of the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gedaechtniskirche (Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church) in Berlin, where a truck crashed into a Christmas market. / AFP PHOTO / Tobias SCHWARZTOBIAS SCHWARZ/AFP/Getty Images
German Chancellor Angela Merkel (foreground), German Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere (L) and German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier (2nd L) stand at a makeshift memorial for the victims of an attack on December 20, 2016 in front of the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gedaechtniskirche (Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church) in Berlin, where a truck crashed into a Christmas market. Twelve people were killed and almost 50 wounded, 18 seriously, when the lorry tore through the crowd on December 19, 2016, smashing wooden stalls and crushing victims, in scenes reminiscent of July's deadly attack in the French Riviera city of Nice. / AFP PHOTO / Tobias SCHWARZTOBIAS SCHWARZ/AFP/Getty Images
Policemen patrol over a Christmas market in Salzburg on December 20, 2016, as security measures are taken after a deadly rampage by a lorry driver at a Berlin Christmas market. / AFP PHOTO / APA / BARBARA GINDL / Austria OUTBARBARA GINDL/AFP/Getty Images
(L-R) Berlin's mayor Michael Mueller, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, German Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere and German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier lay down flowers at a makeshift memorial for the victims of an attack on December 20, 2016 in front of the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gedaechtniskirche (Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church) in Berlin, where a truck crashed into a Christmas market. Twelve people were killed and almost 50 wounded, 18 seriously, when the lorry tore through the crowd on December 19, 2016, smashing wooden stalls and crushing victims, in scenes reminiscent of July's deadly attack in the French Riviera city of Nice. / AFP PHOTO / Tobias SCHWARZTOBIAS SCHWARZ/AFP/Getty Images
German Chancellor Angela Merkel (L), German Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere (2nd L) and German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier (3rd R) arrive to lay down flowers at a makeshift memorial for the victims of an attack on December 20, 2016 in front of the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gedaechtniskirche (Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church) in Berlin, where a truck crashed into a Christmas market. Twelve people were killed and almost 50 wounded, 18 seriously, when the lorry tore through the crowd on December 19, 2016, smashing wooden stalls and crushing victims, in scenes reminiscent of July's deadly attack in the French Riviera city of Nice. / AFP PHOTO / Tobias SCHWARZTOBIAS SCHWARZ/AFP/Getty Images
A card reading in German 'In memory of the victims' is seen on December 20, 2016 at the site where a truck crashed into a Christmas market near the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gedaechtniskirche (Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church) in Berlin. German police said they were treating as "a probable terrorist attack" the killing of 12 people when the speeding lorry cut a bloody swath through the packed Berlin Christmas market. / AFP PHOTO / John MACDOUGALLJOHN MACDOUGALL/AFP/Getty Images
German Chancellor Angela Merkel arrives to sign the book of condolences on December 20, 2016 inside the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gedaechtniskirche (Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church), the day after an attack at the nearby Christmas market in central Berlin. German police said they were treating as "a probable terrorist attack" the killing of 12 people when the speeding lorry cut a bloody swath through the packed Berlin Christmas market. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / HANNIBAL HANSCHKEHANNIBAL HANSCHKE/AFP/Getty Images
BERLIN, GERMANY - DECEMBER 20: German Chancellor Angela Merkel signs a book of condolences at the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church the day after a truck drove into an adjacent, crowded Christmas market on December 20, 2016 in Berlin, Germany. So far 12 people are confirmed dead and 45 injured. Authorities have confirmed they believe the incident was an attack and have arrested a Pakistani man who they believe was the driver of the truck and who had fled immediately after the attack. Among the dead are a Polish man who was found on the passenger seat of the truck. Police are investigating the possibility that the truck, which belongs to a Polish trucking company, was stolen yesterday morning. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
A Muslim mam prays at a makeshift memorial for the attack victims, on December 20, 2016 in front of the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gedaechtniskirche (Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church) in Berlin, where a truck crashed into a Christmas market. Twelve people were killed and almost 50 wounded, 18 seriously, when the lorry tore through the crowd on December 19, 2016, smashing wooden stalls and crushing victims, in scenes reminiscent of July's deadly attack in the French Riviera city of Nice. / AFP PHOTO / John MACDOUGALLJOHN MACDOUGALL/AFP/Getty Images
(L-R) Berlin's mayor Michael Mueller, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, German Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere and German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier lay down flowers at a makeshift memorial for the victims of an attack on December 20, 2016 in front of the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gedaechtniskirche (Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church) in Berlin, where a truck crashed into a Christmas market. Twelve people were killed and almost 50 wounded, 18 seriously, when the lorry tore through the crowd on December 19, 2016, smashing wooden stalls and crushing victims, in scenes reminiscent of July's deadly attack in the French Riviera city of Nice. / AFP PHOTO / Tobias SCHWARZTOBIAS SCHWARZ/AFP/Getty Images
A Muslim mam prays at a makeshift memorial for the attack victims, on December 20, 2016 in front of the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gedaechtniskirche (Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church) in Berlin, where a truck crashed into a Christmas market. Twelve people were killed and almost 50 wounded, 18 seriously, when the lorry tore through the crowd on December 19, 2016, smashing wooden stalls and crushing victims, in scenes reminiscent of July's deadly attack in the French Riviera city of Nice. / AFP PHOTO / John MACDOUGALLJOHN MACDOUGALL/AFP/Getty Images
TOPSHOT - German Chancellor Angela Merkel (foreground), German Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere (L) and German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier (2nd L) stand at a makeshift memorial for the victims of an attack on December 20, 2016 in front of the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gedaechtniskirche (Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church) in Berlin, where a truck crashed into a Christmas market. Twelve people were killed and almost 50 wounded, 18 seriously, when the lorry tore through the crowd on December 19, 2016, smashing wooden stalls and crushing victims, in scenes reminiscent of July's deadly attack in the French Riviera city of Nice. / AFP PHOTO / Tobias SCHWARZTOBIAS SCHWARZ/AFP/Getty Images
Candles and flowers are seen at a makeshift memorial for the attack victims, on December 20, 2016 in front of the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gedaechtniskirche (Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church) in Berlin, where a truck crashed into a Christmas market. Twelve people were killed and almost 50 wounded, 18 seriously, when the lorry tore through the crowd on December 19, 2016, smashing wooden stalls and crushing victims, in scenes reminiscent of July's deadly attack in the French Riviera city of Nice. / AFP PHOTO / John MACDOUGALLJOHN MACDOUGALL/AFP/Getty Images
TOPSHOT - Policemen patrol over the "Wiener Christkindlmarkt" Christmas market in Vienna on December 20, 2016, as security measures are taken after a deadly rampage by a lorry driver at a Berlin Christmas market. Twelve people were killed in the assault at the Berlin shopping district popular with tourists, and 48 people injured, including 18 who are severely wounded. / AFP PHOTO / APA / HERBERT PFARRHOFER / Austria OUTHERBERT PFARRHOFER/AFP/Getty Images
TOPSHOT - German Chancellor Angela Merkel reacts before signing the book of condolences on December 20, 2016 inside the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gedaechtniskirche (Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church), the day after an attack at the nearby Christmas market in central Berlin. German police said they were treating as "a probable terrorist attack" the killing of 12 people when the speeding lorry cut a bloody swath through the packed Berlin Christmas market. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / HANNIBAL HANSCHKEHANNIBAL HANSCHKE/AFP/Getty Images
BERLIN, GERMANY - DECEMBER 20: German Chancellor Angela Merkel signs a book of condolences at the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church the day after a truck drove into an adjacent, crowded Christmas market on December 20, 2016 in Berlin, Germany. So far 12 people are confirmed dead and 45 injured. Authorities have confirmed they believe the incident was an attack and have arrested a Pakistani man who they believe was the driver of the truck and who had fled immediately after the attack. Among the dead are a Polish man who was found on the passenger seat of the truck. Police are investigating the possibility that the truck, which belongs to a Polish trucking company, was stolen yesterday morning. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
A girl looks at candles at a makeshift memorial for the attack victims, on December 20, 2016 in front of the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gedaechtniskirche (Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church) in Berlin, where a truck crashed into a Christmas market. Twelve people were killed and almost 50 wounded, 18 seriously, when the lorry tore through the crowd on December 19, 2016, smashing wooden stalls and crushing victims, in scenes reminiscent of July's deadly attack in the French Riviera city of Nice. / AFP PHOTO / John MACDOUGALLJOHN MACDOUGALL/AFP/Getty Images
German Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere signs the book of condolences on December 20, 2016 inside the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gedaechtniskirche (Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church), the day after an attack at the nearby Christmas market in central Berlin. German police said they were treating as "a probable terrorist attack" the killing of 12 people when the speeding lorry cut a bloody swath through the packed Berlin Christmas market. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / HANNIBAL HANSCHKEHANNIBAL HANSCHKE/AFP/Getty Images
A Muslim mam prays at a makeshift memorial for the attack victims, on December 20, 2016 in front of the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gedaechtniskirche (Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church) in Berlin, where a truck crashed into a Christmas market. Twelve people were killed and almost 50 wounded, 18 seriously, when the lorry tore through the crowd on December 19, 2016, smashing wooden stalls and crushing victims, in scenes reminiscent of July's deadly attack in the French Riviera city of Nice. / AFP PHOTO / John MACDOUGALLJOHN MACDOUGALL/AFP/Getty Images
BERLIN, GERMANY - DECEMBER 20: German Chancellor Angela Merkel (2nd from R) looks on as Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier signs a book of condolences at the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church the day after a truck drove into an adjacent, crowded Christmas market on December 20, 2016 in Berlin, Germany. So far 12 people are confirmed dead and 45 injured. Authorities have confirmed they believe the incident was an attack and have arrested a Pakistani man who they believe was the driver of the truck and who had fled immediately after the attack. Among the dead are a Polish man who was found on the passenger seat of the truck. Police are investigating the possibility that the truck, which belongs to a Polish trucking company, was stolen yesterday morning. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
BERLIN, GERMANY - DECEMBER 20: (L-R) Mayor of Berlin, Michael Muller, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, German Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere and Forign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier lay flowers near where yesterday a lorry ploughed through a Christmas market on December 20, 2016 in Berlin, Germany. So far 12 people are confirmed dead and 45 injured. Authorities have confirmed they believe the incident was an attack and have arrested a Pakistani man who they believe was the driver of the truck and who had fled immediately after the attack. Among the dead are a Polish man who was found on the passenger seat of the truck. Police are investigating the possibility that the truck, which belongs to a Polish trucking company, was stolen yesterday morning.(Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
German Chancellor Angela Merkel (C), German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier (L) and Berlin's mayor Michael Mueller (C) walk through the Christmas market of the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gedaechtniskirche (Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church), the day after an attack at the nearby Christmas market in central Berlin, on December 20, 2016. German police said they were treating as "a probable terrorist attack" the killing of 12 people when the speeding lorry cut a bloody swath through the packed Berlin Christmas market. / AFP PHOTO / Tobias SCHWARZTOBIAS SCHWARZ/AFP/Getty Images
BERLIN, GERMANY - DECEMBER 20: German Chancellor Angela Merkel (R) and Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier depart after laying flowers near where yesterday a lorry ploughed through a Christmas market on December 20, 2016 in Berlin, Germany. So far 12 people are confirmed dead and 45 injured. Authorities have confirmed they believe the incident was an attack and have arrested a Pakistani man who they believe was the driver of the truck and who had fled immediately after the attack. Among the dead are a Polish man who was found on the passenger seat of the truck. Police are investigating the possibility that the truck, which belongs to a Polish trucking company, was stolen yesterday morning. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
German Chancellor Angela Merkel (C), German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier (L) and Berlin's mayor Michael Mueller (C) walk through the Christmas market of the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gedaechtniskirche (Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church), the day after an attack at the nearby Christmas market in central Berlin, on December 20, 2016. German police said they were treating as "a probable terrorist attack" the killing of 12 people when the speeding lorry cut a bloody swath through the packed Berlin Christmas market. / AFP PHOTO / Tobias SCHWARZTOBIAS SCHWARZ/AFP/Getty Images
BERLIN, GERMANY - DECEMBER 20: (L-R) Mayor of Berlin, Michael Muller, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, German Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere and Forign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier lay flowers near where yesterday a lorry ploughed through a Christmas market on December 20, 2016 in Berlin, Germany. So far 12 people are confirmed dead and 45 injured. Authorities have confirmed they believe the incident was an attack and have arrested a Pakistani man who they believe was the driver of the truck and who had fled immediately after the attack. Among the dead are a Polish man who was found on the passenger seat of the truck. Police are investigating the possibility that the truck, which belongs to a Polish trucking company, was stolen yesterday morning.(Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
BERLIN, GERMANY - DECEMBER 20: German Chancellor Angela Merkel (R) and Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier depart after laying flowers near where yesterday a lorry ploughed through a Christmas market on December 20, 2016 in Berlin, Germany. So far 12 people are confirmed dead and 45 injured. Authorities have confirmed they believe the incident was an attack and have arrested a Pakistani man who they believe was the driver of the truck and who had fled immediately after the attack. Among the dead are a Polish man who was found on the passenger seat of the truck. Police are investigating the possibility that the truck, which belongs to a Polish trucking company, was stolen yesterday morning. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
Rescue forces work at the truck that crashed into a Christmas market in Berlin, on December 19, 2016 killing nine persons and injuring at least 50 people. AFP/Getty Images
A firefighter walks past a star after a truck ran into crowded Christmas market in Berlin, Germany, Monday, Dec. 19, 2016, killing several people. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)
Police and firefighters are standing around the site next to the Gedächniskirche church (background) where a truck crashed into a christmas market in Berlin, on December 19, 2016 killing at least nine people and injuring at least 50 people. / AFP PHOTO / John MACDOUGALLJOHN MACDOUGALL/AFP/Getty Images
Firefighters attend an injured person after a truck ran into crowded Christmas market in Berlin, Germany, Monday, Dec. 19, 2016. Police said that several people have been killed. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)
A policeman walks at the site where a truck speeded into a christmas market in Berlin, on December 19, 2016 killing nine persons and injuring at least 50 people. Ambulances and police rushed to the scene after the driver drove up the pavement of the market in a central square popular with tourists less than a week before Christmas, in a scene reminiscent of the deadly truck attack in Nice. / AFP PHOTO / Odd ANDERSENODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images
In this screen grab taken from video, emergency services attend the scene, after an attack by a truck at a Christmas market, in Berlin, Monday, Dec. 19, 2016. German media are reporting a truck has run into a crowded Christmas market in the center of Berlin, causing multiple injuries. Both the Berliner Zeitung newspaper and the Berliner Morgenpost reported the truck ran into the market outside the landmark Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church on Monday evening. (AP)
Berlin's mayor Michael Mueller (4R) walks at the site where a truck speeded into a christmas market in Berlin, on December 19, 2016 killing nine persons and injuring at least 50 people. / AFP PHOTO / Odd ANDERSENODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images
Police and ambulances are standing around the site next to the Gedächniskirche church (background) where a truck crashed into a christmas market in Berlin, on December 19, 2016 killing at least nine people and injuring at least 50 people. / AFP PHOTO / Odd ANDERSENODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images
Police blocks a road leading to the site next to the Gedächniskirche church (background) where a truck crashed into a christmas market in Berlin, on December 19, 2016 killing at least nine people and injuring at least 50 people. / AFP PHOTO / Odd ANDERSENODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images
A police man stands at the site where a truck speeded into a christmas market in Berlin, on December 19, 2016 killing nine persons and injuring at least 50 people. / AFP PHOTO / John MACDOUGALLJOHN MACDOUGALL/AFP/Getty Images
Rescue forces work at the site where a truck speeded into a christmas market in Berlin, on December 19, 2016 killing nine persons and injuring at least 50 people. / AFP PHOTO / Odd ANDERSENODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images
Rescue forces work at the site where a truck speeded into a christmas market in Berlin, on December 19, 2016 killing nine persons and injuring at least 50 people. / AFP PHOTO / Odd ANDERSENODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images
Police blocks a road leading to the site next to the Gedächniskirche church where a truck crashed into a christmas market in Berlin, on December 19, 2016 killing at least nine people and injuring at least 50 people. / AFP PHOTO / Odd ANDERSENODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images
Rescue forces stand near the site where a truck speeded into a christmas market in Berlin, on December 19, 2016 killing nine persons and injuring at least 50 people. / AFP PHOTO / Odd ANDERSENODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images
Rescue forces stand near the site where a truck speeded into a christmas market in Berlin, on December 19, 2016 killing nine persons and injuring at least 50 people. / AFP PHOTO / Odd ANDERSENODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images
Police stand beside a damaged truck which ran into crowded Christmas market in Berliin Berlin, Germany, Monday, Dec. 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)
Police blocks a road leading to the site next to the Gedächniskirche church (background) where a truck crashed into a christmas market in Berlin, on December 19, 2016 killing at least nine people and injuring at least 50 people. / AFP PHOTO / Odd ANDERSENODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images
Police guard a Christmas market after a truck ran into the crowded Christmas market in Berliin Berlin, Germany, Monday, Dec. 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)
Police blocks a road leading to the site next to the Gedächniskirche church (background) where a truck crashed into a christmas market in Berlin, on December 19, 2016 killing at least nine people and injuring at least 50 people. / AFP PHOTO / Odd ANDERSENODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images
A policeman stands near the site where a truck speeded into a christmas market in Berlin, on December 19, 2016 killing nine persons and injuring at least 50 people. / AFP PHOTO / John MACDOUGALLJOHN MACDOUGALL/AFP/Getty Images
BERLIN, GERMANY - DECEMBER 19: Rescue workers arrive to the area after a lorry truck ploughed through a Christmas market on December 19, 2016 in Berlin, Germany. Several people have died while dozens have been injured as police investigate the attack at a market outside the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church on the Kurfuerstendamm and whether it is linked to a terrorist plot. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
Policemen stand near the site where a truck speeded into a christmas market in Berlin, on December 19, 2016 killing nine persons and injuring at least 50 people. / AFP PHOTO / John MACDOUGALLJOHN MACDOUGALL/AFP/Getty Images
BERLIN, GERMANY - DECEMBER 19: Rescue workers arrive to the area after a lorry truck ploughed through a Christmas market on December 19, 2016 in Berlin, Germany. Several people have died while dozens have been injured as police investigate the attack at a market outside the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church on the Kurfuerstendamm and whether it is linked to a terrorist plot. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
Policemen stand at the site where a truck speeded into a christmas market in Berlin, on December 19, 2016 killing nine persons and injuring at least 50 people. / AFP PHOTO / Odd ANDERSENODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images
BERLIN, GERMANY - DECEMBER 19: Police speak to an ambulance near the area after a lorry truck ploughed through a Christmas market on December 19, 2016 in Berlin, Germany. Several people have died while dozens have been injured as police investigate the attack at a market outside the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church on the Kurfuerstendamm and whether it is linked to a terrorist plot. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
BERLIN, GERMANY - DECEMBER 19: Police cars line up the area after a lorry truck ploughed through a Christmas market on December 19, 2016 in Berlin, Germany. Several people have died while dozens have been injured as police investigate the attack at a market outside the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church on the Kurfuerstendamm and whether it is linked to a terrorist plot. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
BERLIN, GERMANY - DECEMBER 19: Ambulances are parked near the area after a lorry truck ploughed through a Christmas market on December 19, 2016 in Berlin, Germany. Several people have died while dozens have been injured as police investigate the attack at a market outside the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church on the Kurfuerstendamm and whether it is linked to a terrorist plot. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
BERLIN, GERMANY - DECEMBER 19: An ambulance and rescue workers arrive to the area after a lorry truck ploughed through a Christmas market on December 19, 2016 in Berlin, Germany. Several people have died while dozens have been injured as police investigate the attack at a market outside the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church on the Kurfuerstendamm and whether it is linked to a terrorist plot. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
BERLIN, GERMANY - DECEMBER 19: Police stand near the area after a lorry truck ploughed through a Christmas market on December 19, 2016 in Berlin, Germany. Several people have died while dozens have been injured as police investigate the attack at a market outside the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church on the Kurfuerstendamm and whether it is linked to a terrorist plot. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
BERLIN, GERMANY - DECEMBER 19: An ambulance drives near the area after a lorry truck ploughed through a Christmas market on December 19, 2016 in Berlin, Germany. Several people have died while dozens have been injured as police investigate the attack at a market outside the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church on the Kurfuerstendamm and whether it is linked to a terrorist plot. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
Ambulances arrive at the scene where a truck speeded into a christmas market in Berlin, on December 19, 2016 killing nine persons and injuring at least 50 people. / AFP PHOTO / Odd ANDERSENODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images
Ambulances arrive on a road leading to a scene next to the Gedächniskirche church where a truck crashed into a christmas market in Berlin, on December 19, 2016 killing at least nine people and injuring at least 50 people. / AFP PHOTO / Odd ANDERSENODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images
Police blocks a road leading to a scene next to the Gedächniskirche church where a truck crashed into a christmas market in Berlin, on December 19, 2016 killing at least nine people and injuring at least 50 people. / AFP PHOTO / Odd ANDERSENODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images
People stand at the scene where a truck speeded into a christmas market in Berlin, on December 19, 2016 killing nine persons and injuring at least 50 people. / AFP PHOTO / John MACDOUGALLJOHN MACDOUGALL/AFP/Getty Images
Police blocks a road leading to a scene where a truck speeded into a christmas market in Berlin, on December 19, 2016 killing at least one person and injuring at least 50 people. / AFP PHOTO / John MACDOUGALLJOHN MACDOUGALL/AFP/Getty Images
A policeman stands near the scene where a truck speeded into a christmas market in Berlin, on December 19, 2016 killing nine persons and injuring at least 50 people. / AFP PHOTO / John MACDOUGALLJOHN MACDOUGALL/AFP/Getty Images

By Robert Fisk

There is something infinitely naive in our pursuit of the identity of those behind the massacres which Isis is committing in Europe. Yes, we need to know the names.

Sure, we need to know what their wives or parents thought. Did they know? How did the perpetrator of Monday’s Berlin truck killings communicate with Isis? Or did he merely imbibe their political instruction manual? After the Bataclan mass murders and the lorry slaughter in Nice, we asked the same questions.

But we didn’t bother to ask what Isis was trying to do. Was it a tactic of ‘terror’ – ‘terror’ being the pejorative word that enables us to avoid all rational thought in the aftermath of any bloodbath – or a strategy, a thought-through political attempt to produce a profound crisis in the societies of western Europe.

And the simple answer is that it was a strategy. The ‘grey zone’, a phrase invented by Isis almost two years ago, first made its appearance in the group’s French-language publications, obviously intended for those Muslims who make up perhaps 10 per cent of the population of France – the nation with the largest number of Muslims in Europe.

Isis wanted to eliminate ‘the grey zone’ which it identified as those western – ‘Crusader’, ‘Christian’, etc – countries with a large Muslim immigrant community. Muslims should revolt against their European nations (or their host nations, if not actually citizens) and create conflict within the countries.

The intention was to provoke European states to “persecute” the Muslims within their frontiers in acts of reprisal for the mass killing of Western Europeans – presumably non-Muslim – civilians. In fact, it didn’t matter to Isis if their victims were Muslims – since the latter were mere ‘apostates’ who had accommodated to non-Muslim societies and adapted to their secular rules for economic or political advantage. In a mass flight from the vengeful ‘Crusaders’, according to a French edition of ‘Dabiq’ in early 2015, the Muslims of Europe would migrate to the Caliphate of the Islamic State” and thereby escape persecution from the Crusader governments and citizens.”

In other words, they wished to provoke the non-Muslim people of Europe to reject their millions of Muslim fellow-citizens. An uprising among Isis followers – however few – would produce mass murder by the ‘Christians’ of Europe. That was – and obviously still is – the strategy. And it has had some success.

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The rise of far-right parties in both western and eastern Europe has a strong anti-Muslim/anti-immigrant detonation, and the hunt for political power by those who wish to discriminate against Muslims (or ‘persecute’ them) has been fuelled by mass killings carried out in Isis’ name. Thus Angela Merkel, the angel of the one million refugees who sought sanctuary in Europe last year, is herself now dressing in the dark robes of Mephistopheles (by objecting, ironically, to the dark robes worn by Muslim women). Faustus, of course, was a character of German folklore long before Christopher Marlowe wrote about him.

But the Isis’ strategy has far more recent precedents than a man (or woman) who sells his soul to the devil. First a health warning: there is no connection between Isis and the man widely regarded as the Greatest Briton in history. But when Britain remained the only country still under arms against Nazi Germany in 1940, Winston Churchill believed that the occupied people of Europe should rise up against their Nazi occupiers. He believed – not without reason – that Western Europeans under German domination were settling far too peacefully into the role of quiescent occupied peoples, making accommodation for – and creating collaboration with – Hitler’s army and Gestapo.

Churchill was right. Crushed by economic as well as military disaster, the people of France, Denmark, Holland and Belgium were far too busy trying to protect their families and feed their children to start an insurrection. Furthermore, they knew – as Churchill knew – that any armed resistance to German occupation would immediately lead to the murder of hostages, the destruction of villages, executions, deportations and mass murder – the sort of ‘persecution’ which Isis obviously hopes, however vainly, would be visited upon the Muslims of Europe if they continue their attacks on the European Continent and, indeed, in Britain.

But Churchill was ruthless. “And now, set Europe ablaze,” he told his minister of economic warfare, Hugh Dalton, who set up what was to be called the Special Operations Executive (SOE), whose extraordinary and courageous exploits of arms smuggling, ambushes and sabotage – clearly regarded as ‘terrorism’ by many of Churchill’s associates – led to great losses, civilian reprisals, the death of many innocents and a history of defeat.

Not of victory, as post-war monochrome movies about SOE’s daring-do would have cinemagoers believe. Churchill called his policy “a new instrument of war”. The Spanish had used just such an instrument during the Peninsula war, the ‘guerrilleros’. And as a student of history, Churchill well knew the terrifying results for civilians. Goya depicted their suffering for all time.

The happier side of this comparison, however, is clear. Churchill’s policy – justified for him at the time, however cruel – did not work. It took years, and the terror assaults by the Germans which they had used in eastern Europe, before armed resistance to their rule became a serious problem for Nazi occupiers.

And today’s western Europeans, however much the right may try to earn their votes with their anti-Muslim hatred, are not Nazis – much as Isis may wish them to be. The ‘Crusaders’ ceased to exist six hundred years ago. Millions of Muslims cannot be turned into ‘apostates’ because Isis identifies them as such. They wish to live in Europe.

Besides, the Muslims of the Islamic world had their chance of joining the Isis Caliphate last year. They could have walked, marched or trekked across the deserts to Raqqa and Mosul to join the ‘Caliph’ al-Baghdadi. But they didn’t. Instead, they took the train to Germany. Which remains the greatest defeat Isis has suffered in more than two years. Europeans can maintain that defeat by turning away from those of their non-Muslim fellow citizens – in effect Isis’ allies – who advance a policy of revenge and racism.

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