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Fionola Meredith

Music is part of the human experience, and no matter what happens we can't let it die

Fionola Meredith


The emergency arts fund must not become another sectarian carve-up, insists Fionola Meredith

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Conductor Rafael Payare with the Ulster Orchestra performing in Ulster Hall back in 2018

Conductor Rafael Payare with the Ulster Orchestra performing in Ulster Hall back in 2018

Conductor Rafael Payare with the Ulster Orchestra performing in Ulster Hall back in 2018

The music stopped on March 23, 2020. That was the date we entered lockdown. In the resulting chaos, frequently bordering on panic, few of us were thinking about when we'd next be able to go out, have a drink and listen to some good music again. Flabbergasted by the speed with which our lives had been turned upside down, we struggled to deal with this new, contagious - and in the worst cases, deadly - virus.

So the silence went unnoticed for a while.

It's only now as we emerge tentatively into the post-pandemic world that many of us are starting to realise what we've been missing.