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Frank Mitchell

The refugees are in a dire situation and are forced to reach out and ask for a helping hand

Frank Mitchell


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Giving a help up to help others is in our nature

Giving a help up to help others is in our nature

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Giving a help up to help others is in our nature

Have you ever had lunch with some refugees? Have you sat across the table and watched them eat? Did you notice the fear in their eyes and did you hear the gratitude in their voice? When I was nine-years-old, two families came to our house. My mother cooked for them in the way she would for special guests. She used the best china and put on a three-course spread. She loved every moment of it. If they had arrived a month earlier, however, it might not have been possible to welcome them in the way she did.

At that point we were living in a cold rented house. We had no electricity and water had to be boiled in saucepans to heat a bath. That’s the way it was until I was nine and there was little need to bring out the Royal Albert. It was being kept for a special occasion but as yet none had arisen. Now we were in the new house. A small country bungalow. The refugees were our first guests and they crowded around our kitchen table. We entertained two mums and seven children, some younger than me.


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